Respiratory Safety 131

“Respiratory Safety” details the appropriate types and use of breathing equipment for various airborne hazards. There are two common types of breathing equipment: air-purifying respirators and atmosphere-supplying respirators. Employees who require breathing equipment must undergo a medical evaluation and fit-testing. OSHA requires employers to provide employees who require breathing equipment with clean respirators in good condition, and comprehensive, understandable training. Employees must be able to demonstrate their knowledge of and ability to use respirators prior to ever wearing one.

Training on the use and importance of respirators is crucial to doing safe and effective work and reduces accidents, injuries, and lost work hours. After taking this class, users will be able to describe OSHA regulations and best practices for using respiratory equipment, along with environments that require this equipment.

Class Details

Class Name:
Respiratory Safety 131
Description:
“Respiratory Safety” details the appropriate types and use of breathing equipment for various airborne hazards. There are two common types of breathing equipment: air-purifying respirators and atmosphere-supplying respirators. Employees who require breathing equipment must undergo a medical evaluation and fit-testing. OSHA requires employers to provide employees who require breathing equipment with clean respirators in good condition, and comprehensive, understandable training. Employees must be able to demonstrate their knowledge of and ability to use respirators prior to ever wearing one.

Training on the use and importance of respirators is crucial to doing safe and effective work and reduces accidents, injuries, and lost work hours. After taking this class, users will be able to describe OSHA regulations and best practices for using respiratory equipment, along with environments that require this equipment.
Version:
2.0
Difficulty:
Beginner
Number of Lessons:
18
Related 1.0 Class:
Respiratory Safety 195

Class Outline

  • Hazardous Breathing Environments
  • Respiratory Protection Program
  • Environment and Exposure Assessment
  • Respirator Selection Criteria
  • Hazardous Breathing Environments Review
  • Types of Respirators
  • Medical Evaluation
  • Respirator Fitting
  • General Fit Testing
  • Qualitative Fit Testing
  • Quantitative Fit Test
  • Respirator Types and Fits Review
  • Use of Respirators
  • Maintenance and Care of Respirators
  • Air-Purifying Respirators and ESL
  • Respirator Training
  • Engineering Controls
  • Respiratory Maintenance and Care Review

Objectives

  • Describe proper protection in hazardous breathing environments.
  • Describe the requirements of a respiratory protection program.
  • Describe methods of exposure assessment.
  • Identify respirator selection criteria.
  • Describe the different types of respirators.
  • Describe OSHA's medical evaluation requirements.
  • Describe how respirators seal on the wearer's face.
  • Define general fit testing.
  • Define qualitative fit testing.
  • Define quantitative fit testing.
  • Describe methods of assuring proper fit and function of respirators.
  • Describe respirator maintenance procedures.
  • Describe methods of maintaining air-purifying respirators.
  • Describe OSHA's respirator training requirements.
  • Describe possible engineering controls for hazardous environments.

Job Roles

Certifications

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
air pressure The force that air exerts due to its motion. Respirators may have positive or negative air pressure, making the air they hold heavier or lighter than ambient air.
air-purifying combination respirator An air-purifying respirator that consists of a face mask that covers the eyes, nose, and mouth. Air-purifying combination respirators have filters that capture particles, as well as gases or vapors.
air-purifying respirator A form of PPE with an air-purifying filter, cartridge, or canister that removes specific air contaminants. Air-purifying respirators pass ambient air through the air-purifying element.
air-purifying respirator A respirator with a filter, cartridge, or canister that removes specific contaminants from the air. Air-purifying respirators pass ambient air through the air-purifying element.
ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter A type of quantitative test. An ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter measures the number of tiny solid or liquid particles in the atmosphere.
ambient air Air that is particular to a specific environment. Ambient air may contain chemicals that are hazardous for employees to inhale.
asbestos A fibrous, heat-resistant, naturally-occurring mineral once widely used for various purposes, most notably insulation. Asbestos is known to cause respiratory issues and deadly diseases.
assigned protection factor APF. The workplace level of respiratory protection that a respirator is expected to provide to wearers. APF protection levels vary based on the hazards present in the environment.
atmosphere-supplying respirators A breathing device that supplies the wearer with clean air. Atmosphere-supplying respirators supply this air to users from a source that is fully separate from ambient air.
atmospheric testing Measurement of the content of the environment using electronic equipment. Atmospheric testing is used to detect the presence of gases.
canister A container, also known as a cartridge, that holds filters, absorbent materials, chemical substances, or a combination of these items. Canisters and their contents remove specific contaminants from the air as it passes through the container.
canisters A container, also known as a cartridge, that holds filters, absorbent materials, chemical substances, or a combination of these things. Canisters and their contents remove specific contaminants from the air as it passes through them.
cartridge A container, also known as a canister, that holds filters, absorbent materials, chemical substances, or a combination of these items. Cartridges and their contents remove specific contaminants from the air as it passes through the containers.
cartridges A container, also known as a canister, that holds filters, absorbent materials, chemical substances, or a combination of these items. Cartridges and their contents remove specific contaminants from the air as it passes through the containers.
chamber An enclosed space. In fit testing, a chamber may be a room or a temporary enclosure made of plastic.
change schedule A method of tracking the service life of respirator components. A change schedule should be instituted by an employer.
confined spaces An area with limited means of entry or exit that is large enough for an employee to enter and perform work. To safely work in a confined space, atmospheric testing may be required to identify hazards.
contaminants Any substance that poses a safety risk or disturbs a manufacturing process. Working around contaminants requires employees to wear proper respiratory protection.
controlled negative pressure test CNP. A quantitative fit test that starts with negative air pressure and uses a constant, equal amount of air flow in and out of the mask. A CNP test measures leakage into the mask.
denatonium benzoate The most bitter-tasting substance known to humans. Denatonium benzoate is used in qualitative fit testing.
end of service life ESL. The point at which a respirator is no longer providing adequate protection. ESL occurs when the air-purifying element, such as a cartridge, has become saturated with contaminants.
end-of-service-life indicators ESLI. Signs that a respirator is no longer providing adequate protection. ESLIs may include changes in the appearance of the respirator, specific alarms, or integral device components activated by respirator deterioration.
engineering controls Steps taken by an administrator to reduce hazards and safety risks before they reach employees. Engineering controls can include switching to non-hazardous chemicals or enclosing a process to prevent the release of fumes.
exhalation valve A component of a respirator that allows the wearer to push air out of the mask without letting any ambient air back in. Exhalation valves preserve the safety of the mask wearer.
exposure Contact with hazardous materials through inhalation or touching of the skin or mucous membranes. When exposure may occur, employees must use PPE and other precautions.
exposure limits The maximum amount or concentration of a hazard that can be present or that a worker may experience without causing a health hazard. Exposure limits vary based on the specific hazard.
fit testing Evaluating the way in which a respirator fits its wearer. The three forms of fit testing are general, qualitative, and quantitative.
gas A fluid phase of matter characterized by the tendency to flow and to expand indefinitely. Gas can be hazardous and undetectable by the five senses.
gas and vapor respirator A respirator that contains chemical filters made to protect against specific gas and vapor hazards. Gas and vapor respirators do not filter airborne particles or mist.
general fit testing Assessing the suitability of a respirator to assure that the facemask will stay tight. Assessments are conducted in various positions and conditions.
generated aerosol fit test A type of quantitative fit test. Generated aerosol fit tests measure the number of tiny solid or liquid particles suspended in the atmosphere.
hazardous breathing environment Air that is contaminated with dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors. Employees must wear respirators when working in hazardous breathing environments.
IDLH Immediately dangerous to life or health. Atmospheres that are capable of causing death, irreversible adverse health effects, or the impairment of an individual's ability to escape from a dangerous atmosphere. IDLH environments are classified as such if they lack oxygen or have unknown contents.
immediately dangerous to life and health IDLH. Atmospheres that are capable of causing death, irreversible adverse health effects, or the impairment of an individual's ability to escape from a dangerous atmosphere. IDLH environments are classified as such if they lack oxygen or have unknown contents.
isoamyl acetate A chemical known for its banana-like odor. Isoamyl acetate is used in qualitative fit testing.
lacquer thinner A combination of chemicals used to dissolve lacquer. Lacquer thinner is a respiratory hazard.
mist A suspension of microscopic liquid particles of various sizes in the air. The spray of metal cutting fluids often produces mist.
musculoskeletal Muscles, joints, bones, and related structures. The musculoskeletal system is studied in a medical evaluation required by OSHA to issue breathing equipment.
negative pressure respirator A respirator in which the air pressure inside the facemask is lower than the ambient air pressure when the wearer inhales the air. A negative pressure respirator requires fit testing to ensure user safety.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA. A government agency that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States. OSHA helps employers reduce injuries, illnesses, and deaths in the workplace.
odor threshold screening An assessment of the subject's ability to detect the scent of a substance prior to putting on a respirator. Odor threshold screenings require employees to sniff isoamyl acetate.
OSHA Occupational safety and health administration. A government agency that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States. OSHA helps employers reduce injuries, illnesses, and deaths in the workplace.
particulate respirator An air-purifying respirator that captures contaminant particles, such as dust and mold, that are often used during processes that involve sawing, in fibrous filters. Particulate respirators can be used for a wide array of jobs.
positive pressure respirator A respirator in which the air pressure inside the respirator inlet covering exceeds the ambient air pressure outside the respirator. A positive pressure respirator requires fit testing to ensure user safety.
powered air-purifying respirator PAPR. An air-purifying respirator that depends on an external power source to provide clean air to the user. PAPRs use a fan to send air through cartridges to clear it of contamination.
pulmonary diseases Illnesses where the lungs and respiratory system are affected. Emphysema is a pulmonary disease.
qualitative fit test QLFT. A pass or fail assessment of the adequacy of a respirator. A QLFT determines whether or not someone can detect the scents, flavors, or negative effects of an airborne substance.
quantitative fit test QNFT. An assessment of the adequacy of respirator fit that uses numerical measurement of the amount of leakage into the respirator. QNFTs use a probe inside the facemask.
respirators Breathing devices worn to prevent inhalation of hazardous substances. Respirators may purify air or supply air for the wearer.
respiratory protection A form of personal protective equipment that protects the wearer from hazards present in the air. Respirators are a common type of breathing protection.
respiratory protection program A permanent written program that contains work-specific procedures for using respirators. Respiratory protection programs are required by OSHA.
respiratory protection program administrator An individual who oversees the use of breathing equipment and implements the written respiratory protection program in the workplace. A respiratory protection program administrator must be fully trained in the use of respirators.
saccharine An artificial sweetener. Saccharine is used in qualitative fit testing.
safety data sheet SDS. Mandatory information that must accompany almost every chemical in the workplace except for items like cleaning supplies. An SDS includes details such as the precautions and first aid procedures associated with exposure to a chemical.
self-contained breathing apparatus SCBA. An atmosphere-supplying respirator for which the air source is carried by its user during short-term exposure or when an environment is IDLH or potentially IDLH. An SCBA wearer must be capable of carrying the weight of an air tank.
stannic chloride A colorless liquid chemical that fumes upon contact with air and creates smoke. Stannic chloride is used in qualitative fit testing.
supplied-air respirator SAR. A breathing device that consists of a face mask with a long hose that connects to a stationary tank of compressed air. Also called airline respirators, SARs are used when employees must spend long periods in low-oxygen atmospheres.
taste threshold screening An assessment of the subject's ability to detect the taste of a substance prior to putting on a respirator. Taste threshold screenings use saccharine and denatonium benzoate.
vapor The gaseous form of a substance that is a liquid or solid at normal temperatures. Some vapors are hazardous if inhaled.