SDS and Hazard Communication 151

"SDS and Hazard Communication" focuses on communication methods about hazardous workplace substances and how they increase employee awareness and safety. Education, labeling, data collection, testing, and other communication methods detail the dangers of specific chemicals and offer methods of protection from physical and health hazards. OSHA requires that employers establish a written hazard communication program to communicate employee responsibilities, standard implementation, chemical hazards, and safety measures. Hazard communication programs must include a chemical inventory, specific labeling, SDS for each individual chemical, and training.

After taking this class, users will be able to describe OSHA regulations regarding hazardous materials and SDS and their impact on daily workplace operations. Understanding these regulations is critical in maintaining workplace safety and efficient operation.

Class Details

Class Name:
SDS and Hazard Communication 151
Description:
"SDS and Hazard Communication" focuses on communication methods about hazardous workplace substances and how they increase employee awareness and safety. Education, labeling, data collection, testing, and other communication methods detail the dangers of specific chemicals and offer methods of protection from physical and health hazards. OSHA requires that employers establish a written hazard communication program to communicate employee responsibilities, standard implementation, chemical hazards, and safety measures. Hazard communication programs must include a chemical inventory, specific labeling, SDS for each individual chemical, and training.

After taking this class, users will be able to describe OSHA regulations regarding hazardous materials and SDS and their impact on daily workplace operations. Understanding these regulations is critical in maintaining workplace safety and efficient operation.
Version:
2.0
Difficulty:
Beginner
Number of Lessons:
22
Related 1.0 Class:
SDS and Hazard Communication 160

Class Outline

  • Hazard Communication
  • Chemicals
  • Classification of Chemical Hazards
  • Physical Hazards
  • Health Hazards with Systemic Effects
  • Health Hazards with Target Organ Effects
  • Hazards Review
  • Hazard Determination
  • Labeling Requirements
  • Labeling Exceptions
  • Hazard Determination and Labeling Requirements Review
  • Safety Data Sheets
  • Safety Data Sheet Requirements
  • Safety Data Sheet Distribution Requirements
  • Training Requirements
  • Safety Data Sheets Review
  • Hazard Communication Program
  • Hazard Communication Requirements: Inventory
  • Hazard Communication Requirements: Labeling
  • Hazard Communication Requirements: SDS
  • Hazard Communication Requirements: Training
  • Final Review

Objectives

  • Describe the ways hazard communication exists and is enforced.
  • Describe chemicals not covered by the HCS.
  • Identify chemical hazard classifications.
  • Identify types of physical hazards.
  • Identify types of health hazards with systemic effects.
  • Identify the target organ effects of health hazards.
  • Identify the steps that chemical manufacturers and importers use to make hazard determinations.
  • Describe OSHA's labeling requirements for hazardous chemicals.
  • Describe instances in which chemicals do not require labeling.
  • Define SDS.
  • Describe the information that OSHA requires an SDS to contain.
  • Describe SDS distribution requirements.
  • Describe the hazardous chemical information and training requirements.
  • Describe the hazard communication program.
  • Describe the hazardous chemical inventory.
  • Describe the labeling requirements necessary for a hazardous communication program.
  • Describe the SDS requirements necessary for a hazardous communication program.
  • Describe the training requirements necessary for a hazardous communication program.

Certifications

NIMS
  • CNC Lathe Operations
  • CNC Milling Operations
  • CNC Milling Programming, Setup, & Operation
  • CNC Turning Programming, Setup, & Operation
  • Drill Press I
  • Grinding I
  • Job Planning, Benchwork, & Layout I
  • Measurement, Materials, & Safety I
  • Milling I
  • Turning Operations: Turning Chucking Skills

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
ACGIH American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. An organization that works to advance occupational and environmental health. The ACGIH created an accepted threshold limit value of exposure.
acute reaction A response to chemical exposure that occurs suddenly or over a short period of time. Acute reactions can be caused by health hazards.
batch tickets The documentation that accompanies a group or quantity of a product. Batch tickets are often used for inventory control.
blood toxin A chemical that causes damage to or disease in the blood or harms blood production. Blood toxins can prevent the blood from carrying oxygen to cells.
boiling point The temperature at which a liquid changes to a vapor. The boiling point of a liquid is listed on its SDS.
carcinogen A cancer-causing substance. Carcinogens are linked to cancer.
CAS number Chemical Abstracts Service number. This number is assigned by the Chemical Abstracts Service to every chemical named in research. The CAS number matches the chemical with appropriate substance information.
chemical Any substance or mixture of substances. Chemicals may be in the form of solids, liquids, or gases, and may consist of one element, such as hydrogen, or a combination of elements, such as water.
chemical stability The measure of a chemical&#39s ability to withstand changes and adjustments in its state or processes without exhibiting reactivity. Chemical stability makes chemicals easier and safer to use.
chronic effect A response to a chemical that occurs after a long period of exposure. Chronic effects can be caused by health hazards.
compliance officer An OSHA representative who enforces OSHA standards through inspection and investigation. A compliance officer may look for evidence that the company is complying with all the requirements of the HCS.
compressed gas Any gas held under pressure in a gas cylinder. Gas under pressure may pose a physical hazard from explosion.
cornea The clear, outer portion of the eye. The cornea is the protective covering over the eye.
corrosive A chemical solid, liquid, or gas that is capable of irreparably harming living tissues or of damaging material on contact. Corrosive chemicals include acids and certain organic materials.
corrosive A chemical that is capable of irreparably harming living tissues or damaging material on contact. Corrosive chemicals include chemicals in solid, liquid, and gas forms.
cutaneous hazard A chemical that causes damage to or disease in the skin or dermal layer. Gloves and other protective clothing can protect employees from cutaneous hazard.
dosage A measurable amount of exposure to a substance or a hazard. Dosage may include exposure to a chemical or even noise.
engineering controls A step taken by an administrator to reduce hazards and safety risks before they can reach employees. Engineering controls may include choosing quality chemicals or installing exhaust systems.
evaporation rate The rate at which a liquid is vaporized into the atmosphere. A chemical's evaporation rate is categorized as a chemical and physical property.
explosion hazards Chemical substances that are likely to burst. Explosion hazards release pressure that can harm those around them.
eye hazard A chemical that causes damage to or disease in the eyes. Eye hazards often damage the cornea.
fire hazards Chemicals that are likely to burn or support fire. Fire hazards may be labeled as combustible or flammable.
flammability The ability or tendency to ignite or burn when exposed to an open flame. The flammability of chemicals and materials is of great danger to employees.
flash point The lowest temperature at which a liquid produces enough vapor to form an ignitable mixture. Liquids with low flash points pose the greatest dangers to those interacting with or near to them.
GHS Globally Harmonized Standard. An international standard for communicating chemical hazards through signs, labeling, and Safety Data Sheets. The GHS is intended to provide employees with similar hazard communication information worldwide.
GHS Globally Harmonized System. An international standard for communicating chemical hazards through signs, labeling, and safety data sheets. The GHS is intended to provide employees with similar hazard communication information worldwide.
Globally Harmonized System GHS. An international standard for communicating chemical hazards through signs, labeling, and Safety Data Sheets. The GHS is intended to provide employees with similar hazard communication information worldwide.
Hazard Communication Standard HCS. An established OSHA policy that sets guidelines for hazard communication. The HCS emphasizes labeling, Safety Data Sheets, and training, and is aligned with the Globally Harmonized System.
Hazardous Materials Identification System HMIS. A hazard rating by numbers that uses labels, bars that are color-coded, and training materials to identify hazardous materials. HMIS labels are permitted by the HCS as long as they include pictograms and hazard warnings.
hazardous waste Disposable matter that poses a risk to human health or the environment. Hazardous waste requires special types of storage and disposal to make it harmless or less dangerous.
HCS Hazard Communication Standard. An established OSHA policy that sets guidelines for hazard communication. The HCS emphasizes labeling, Safety Data Sheets, and training, and is aligned with the Globally Harmonized System.
HCS Hazard Communication Standard. An established OSHA policy that sets guidelines for hazard communication. The HCS emphasizes labeling, SDS, and training.
health hazards Any chemical that can cause an acute reaction, chronic effect, or both. These chemicals may compromise a person's health and safety.
hepatotoxin A chemical that causes damage to or disease in the liver. The effects of a hepatotoxin depend on various factors such as the amount and method of exposure.
highly toxic agent A chemical that has been shown to cause death in lab rats that receive relatively low dosages. Highly toxic agents can be deadly when exposure occurs.
immediate use Hazardous chemicals that are under the control of and used only by the person who transfers them from a labeled container. Immediate use can only occur within the work shift in which the chemicals are transferred.
industrial hygienist A person trained to anticipate, recognize, evaluate, and develop controls for occupational health and environmental hazards. Industrial hygienists may perform the data analysis during hazard determination.
in-plant containers A receptacle in the workplace that contains hazardous chemicals. In-plant containers must have proper labeling to describe their contents.
irritant A chemical that causes inflammation and swelling in human tissue. An irritant usually causes short-term effects.
labels A printed form of identification that is attached to a container. OSHA requires chemicals to have labels with specific information.
Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS. This term was used in place of Safety Data Sheet (SDS). MSDS must be updated to SDS.
melting and freezing points The temperatures at which a substance changes from a solid to a liquid or from a liquid to a solid. Melting and freezing points are some of the properties of a substance.
mixture A non-reactive combination or a solution composed of two or more substances. Salt water is an example of a simple mixture.
nephrotoxin A chemical that causes damage to or disease in the kidneys. The effects of a nephrotoxin are more severe in people already suffering from kidney problems.
nervous system The system that includes the nerves, spinal cord, and brain. The nervous system controls all bodily functions.
neurotoxin A chemical that causes damage to or disease in the nervous system. A neurotoxin can cause target organ effects.
NFPA 704 National Fire Protection Association 704. This is a standard that is maintained by the NFPA that details a system of identification of the hazards of materials for emergency response. NFPA 704 labels for chemical containers meet the HCS 2012 requirements if pictograms and hazard warnings meet the new standard.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA. A government agency that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States. OSHA helps employers reduce injuries, illnesses, and deaths in the workplace.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA. A government agency under the U.S. Dept. of Labor that helps employers reduce injuries, illnesses, and deaths in the workplace. OSHA ensures safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women through research, information, standards, enforcement, education, and training.
organic peroxide A type of reactive hazard that can catch fire independently. Organic peroxides are oxidizers and fuels simultaneously.
oxidizer Any substance that may trigger or promote flammability in another substance. Oxidizers may start fires.
permissible exposure limit The amount of time, based on a time-weighted average of an eight-hour shift, that someone can be exposed to a harmful substance. The permissible exposure limit is set by OSHA and indicates exposure that can occur before adverse effects take place.
Personal Protective Equipment PPE. Any of the various articles of clothing or safeguarding devices that are used to prevent injury in the workplace. Common examples of PPE include safety glasses, gloves, masks, gowns, and earplugs.
pH A measure of the acidity or alkalinity of a substance. The pH of a substance is considered one of its chemical properties.
physical hazards Any chemical that could cause bodily harm from injuries such as burns. These chemicals may be reactive, to themselves or other substances, in a variety of ways.
portable container A small receptacle that a chemical is transferred to from a larger receptacle so that it is easy to transport from place to place. Portable containers do not require labels.
pyrophoric A chemical that ignites or explodes spontaneously. Pyrophorics often ignite when exposed to air or water.
reactive hazards Chemicals that are likely to catch fire or explode on their own or when exposed to water. Reactive hazards may be described as corrosive to metal, water-reactive, self-heating, or organic peroxide.
reactivity The measure of a chemical's ability to undergo a change. Reactivity may include the forming of bonds, combining with another chemical, producing energy, or even breaking down.
reproductive toxin A chemical that causes damage to or disease in male or female reproductive systems or organs. Reproductive toxins may harm a female's ovaries or even unborn fetuses.
respiratory toxin A chemical that causes damage to or disease in the lungs or another part of the breathing system. Respiratory toxins include certain levels of formaldehyde and ammonia.
Safety Data Sheet SDS. Mandatory information that accompanies nearly every workplace chemical. An SDS includes details such as the precautions and first aid procedures associated with exposure to a chemical.
Safety Data Sheets SDS. Mandatory documentation that must accompany every chemical in the workplace. An SDS includes information such as the hazards, precautions, and first-aid procedures associated with the chemical.
Safety Data Sheets SDS. Mandatory information that must accompany almost every chemical in the workplace. An SDS includes details such as the hazards, precautions, and first-aid procedures associated with the chemical.
self-heating Any non-pyrophoric substance that will heat when in contact with air. Self-heating substances will usually ignite only when in large quantities or only after a long period of exposure to the air.
sensitizer A chemical that causes an allergic reaction. A sensitizer can cause a systemic effect on the human body.
solubility The measure of the amount of a substance that will dissolve in a liquid. The lower the solubility rating, the less likely the substance will dissolve.
stationary process container A chemical container that is not moved but used. A workplace should have an area that is designated for stationary process containers with a sign that indicates the purpose of that area.
substance A chemical element or compound. Substances may exist in the form of solids, liquids, or gases, and may consist of one element, such as hydrogen, or a combination of elements, such as water.
systemic effect The result of a hazard that affects the entire body. Systemic effects may cause symptoms in one or two areas, such as the skin or lungs, but affect the whole body.
target organ hazards Any chemical that causes an effect in specific organs of the body. These chemicals may be hepatotoxins, nephrotoxins, or neurotoxins, among others.
threshold limit value for exposure The level at which a worker can be repeatedly exposed to a chemical without negative effects. The threshold limit value for exposure is set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.
toxic agent A chemical that has been shown to cause death in lab rats who receive relatively high dosages. Toxic agents are hazardous to humans.
toxicologist A scientist trained to study the nature and effects of chemicals on living organisms. Toxicologists may perform the data analysis during hazard determination.
trade associations A professional group that promotes particular industries. Trade associations often offer assistance and training to members and develop industry standards.
water-reactive A chemical that explodes or catches fire when exposed to water. Water-reactive chemicals are classified as a reactive hazard.