Hand and Power Tool Safety 201

The class “Hand and Power Tool Safety” provides guidelines for the safe use of common hand and power tools. Employees should never remove any safety guards from a tool’s point of operation unless authorized. Tools must be regularly cleaned and maintained, and all blades must be kept sharp. The worksite must be kept organized, clean, and dry. All tool applications require PPE, including eye and other protection. Before working, employees must consult the owner's manual and be familiar with how the tool functions. Employees must also use the right tool for the job and follow the work practices that are specific to each type of tool.

When employees use proper safety guidelines when handling hand and power tools, their employers benefit from reduced accidents on the job and lowered costs caused by work-related injuries. Safe handling of tools also increases work quality. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the safe use and care of hand and power tools.

Class Details

Class Name:
Hand and Power Tool Safety 201
Description:
The class “Hand and Power Tool Safety” provides guidelines for the safe use of common hand and power tools. Employees should never remove any safety guards from a tool’s point of operation unless authorized. Tools must be regularly cleaned and maintained, and all blades must be kept sharp. The worksite must be kept organized, clean, and dry. All tool applications require PPE, including eye and other protection. Before working, employees must consult the owner's manual and be familiar with how the tool functions. Employees must also use the right tool for the job and follow the work practices that are specific to each type of tool.

When employees use proper safety guidelines when handling hand and power tools, their employers benefit from reduced accidents on the job and lowered costs caused by work-related injuries. Safe handling of tools also increases work quality. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the safe use and care of hand and power tools.
Version:
2.0
Difficulty:
Intermediate
Number of Lessons:
17
Related 1.0 Class:
Hand and Power Tool Safety 145

Class Outline

  • The Importance of Hand and Power Tool Safety
  • Hand and Power Tool Basics
  • Worksite Organization
  • Tool Maintenance and Handling
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hand and Power Tool PPE
  • Point of Operation Safety
  • Hand Tool Safety
  • Electric Power Tool Safety
  • Abrasive Wheel Tool Safety
  • Pneumatic Tool Safety
  • Fuel and Hydraulic Tool Safety
  • Powder-Actuated Tool Safety
  • Power Tool Safety
  • Ergonomics
  • Repetition, Force and Vibration
  • Final Review

Objectives

  • Describe general guidelines for hand and power tool safety.
  • Describe the characteristics of a well-organized worksite.
  • Describe proper tool maintenance and handling.
  • Identify the personal protective equipment used in hand and power tool applications.
  • Describe procedures for point of operation safety.
  • Describe dangerous hand tool conditions.
  • Describe general guidelines for proper electric tool safety.
  • Describe general guidelines for proper abrasive wheel tool safety.
  • Describe general guidelines for proper pneumatic tool safety.
  • Describe general guidelines for proper fuel and hydraulic tool safety.
  • Describe general guidelines for powder-actuated tool safety.
  • Describe ergonomics.
  • Identify the safety risks of tasks that require repetition, force, or vibration.

Certifications

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
base plate The bottom of a tool such as a circular saw. A base plate is also called a shoe.
chisel A sharp metal tool that is used to cut or chip workpiece materials. Chisels must remain clean and sharp.
cutting A machining process that uses a tool to create chips and remove metal from a workpiece. When cutting with an abrasive wheel, the wheel can discharge particles or become disengaged from its mounting.
ear plugs Ear wear that protects hearing. Earplugs are inserted into the ear canal to reduce exposure to hazardous noise levels.
earmuffs Hearing protection consisting of two coverings connected with a headband. Earmuffs require a perfect seal around the ear.
earplugs Plugs made of waxed cotton, foam, silicone, or rubber that are designed to protect the ear from excess noise. Earplugs can be either disposable and self-forming or professionally fitted.
electric shock The flow of electricity through the body. Severe electric shock can be fatal.
ergonomics The science of designing devices to decrease operator discomfort or fatigue and increase productivity. Workers should follow ergonomic guidelines outlined by a supervisor to prevent injuries.
eye wash stations A designated station in an easily accessible area in which employees may flush their eyes and/or faces with water in the event of an emergency. Approved eye wash stations must be able to provide at least 15 minutes of continuous flow of not less than 1.5 L/min or 0.4 gal/min.
face shield A rigid, transparent plastic sheet that covers the worker's entire face to protect against dust or splashes. Because face shields do not protect against impacts, they are often worn with goggles.
fire extinguisher A portable device that uses a rapid spray of material to put out small fires. A fire extinguisher rated for electrical fires contains a non-flammable gas under extreme pressure and displaces or removes oxygen from the fire.
fire shields A flame-resistant, tarp-like device that is used to isolate a work area. Fire shields protect bystanders and nearby equipment from applications that throw sparks.
flange A flat or raised metal disk that helps deflect mounting stresses from the hole in a grinding wheel. When mounting a grinding wheel, the nut should not be tightened enough to distort the flange.
fuel-powered tools A tool that is powered by fuel, usually gasoline. Fuel-powered tools require proper ventilation.
fumes A cloud of particles suspended in a gas. Applications that emit fumes require proper ventilation.
grinding A machining process that uses an abrasive to cut the surface of a workpiece. Grinding uses an abrasive wheel that can discharge particles or become disengaged from its mounting.
ground fault circuit interrupter GFCI. A type of switch that is disabled if the electricity should come into contact with water. GFCIs should be used outside or whenever there is a chance for water to contact a power source.
grounded Safely connected to a neutral body, like the earth, which can absorb a stray electrical charge. Electric tools must be grounded to help prevent electric shock.
hand tools A tool powered by an operator's manual force. Hand tools must be kept clean and sharp in order to avoid injury.
hand wash stations A designated station in an easily accessible area in which employees may wash their hands. Workers should be familiar with the location and use of hand wash stations in the workplace.
hard hat A lightweight, protective head covering, usually made of plastic. Hard hats protect the head from impacts, bumps, and electrical shock.
hydraulic tools A tool that is powered by a liquid. A torque wrench is one example of a hydraulic tool.
jackhammers A powerful pneumatic tool that is used to chisel or hammer away at surfaces. Because of their vibrating motion, jackhammers require special safety considerations.
kilopascals kPa. A unit of measurement in the metric system. Kilopascals are used to measure pressure.
lockout A safety procedure required by OSHA that takes steps to isolate the energy source and dissipate all stored energy during repair or maintenance work. Never try to operate equipment that is under lockout.
mounting The device that holds the wheel on the tool and facilitates its movement. The abrasive wheel must be able to move freely without obstruction on the mounting.
mushroomed heads A flaring of the end of a chipping tool due to excessive use. Using tools with mushroomed heads is dangerous because pieces can fly off and hit the employee or other bystanders.
muzzle A safety guard that protects employees from coming into contact with dangerous parts of a tool. For example, a muzzle covers a nail gun until it is pressed against a workpiece.
neutral position The proper or correct position of a bone or joint at rest. Keeping the spine and wrists in a neutral position can prevent pain and injury.
non-conducting surface A surface that does not conduct heat, electricity, or sound. Workers should stand on non-conducting surfaces when using electric power tools.
nut A fastening device containing a hole with internal threads that mates with a screw or bolt. Nuts are used in the mounting of abrasive wheels.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA. A government agency under the U.S. Dept. of Labor that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States. OSHA ensures that employees work in safe and healthy environments.
OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration. A government agency under the U.S. Dept. of Labor that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States. OSHA ensures that employees work in safe and healthy environments.
personal protective equipment PPE. Any example of various safety equipment that workers wear or use to prevent injury in the workplace. Safety glasses are common PPE.
pinch points Any place where two components meet. Injury can occur if a body part comes into contact with a pinch point.
pneumatic tool A tool powered by compressed air. Pneumatic tools should be securely attached to their air hoses before use.
point of operation The area where the tool comes into contact with a workpiece or where work is being performed on the workpiece. Employees must never place anything in the path of the point of operation.
point of operation The area where the tool comes into contact with a workpiece or where work is being performed with the workpiece. Employees must never place anything in the path of the point of operation.
polishing A finishing process that uses an abrasive to create a smooth, shiny surface on a part. Polishing uses an abrasive wheel that can discharge particles or become disengaged from its mounting.
posture How a person stands, sits, or arranges his or her body. The correct posture can reduce the occurrence of ergonomic injuries.
pounds per square inch psi. A unit of measurement in the English measuring system. Pounds per square inch is used to measure pressure.
powder-actuated tool A tool powered by a type of an explosive load. Because they require special safety considerations, powder-actuated tools may only be used by approved personnel.
powder-actuated tool A tool that is powered by a type of an explosive load. Because they require special safety considerations, powder-actuated tools may only be used by approved personnel.
power tools A tool powered by an external source such as electricity or compressed air. Power tools must receive regular maintenance and be properly operated to avoid injury.
respirator A breathing device worn to prevent inhalation of hazardous substances. Hand and power tool applications that emit dust, debris, or fumes may require that the operator wear a respirator.
ricochet To rebound from a surface. Employees must make provisions to ensure that fasteners cannot ricochet off a surface.
ring test A test performed on an abrasive wheel to ensure that it is not cracked. An undamaged wheel emits a ringing sound when a non-metallic object is lightly tapped on it.
safety screens A protective screen that isolates a work area to protect bystanders and nearby equipment. Safety screens are similar to fire shields.
safety shoes The most common type of foot PPE that provides many different ways of protecting feet such as from heat, impact, or electrical shock. Most safety shoes have a steel toe.
screwdriver A type of hand tool that tightens and loosens screws. Screwdrivers contain a grip on one end and a shaped tip on the other end that corresponds to the head on the screw.
sensor switch A safety device used on power tools. Sensor switches can have different designs, but the most common type allows the tool to operate while pressure is applied and does not allow the tool to operate when pressure is released.
shoe The bottom of a tool such as a circular saw. A shoe is also called a base plate.
spindle The component of a tool that spins. For safety, spindles must be properly tightened and able to move freely without obstruction.
sprung Loose due to warping. Sprung wrench jaws might slip during use.
tagout The visible labeling of a machine or equipment indicating that it is locked out. Tagged equipment should not be used by unauthorized workers.
tool crib A designated area where extra tools and accessories are kept. Also known as a tool room, a tool crib is typically where tools can be serviced or repaired.
tool retainer A safety device that grips a tool to ensure that it is properly attached to its power source. Pneumatic tools require a tool retainer on each pneumatic component.
tool room A designated area where extra tools and accessories are kept. Also known as a tool crib, a tool room is typically where tools can be serviced or repaired.
ventilation A means of providing fresh air. Fuel-powered tools require ventilation during use.
vise A workholding device with two jaws that grip and hold a workpiece in place. A hand-held abrasive wheel tool should never be clamped in a vise.
wire buffing A finishing process that uses a wire brush to clean and brush metal or deburr edges. When wire buffing with an abrasive wheel, the wheel can discharge particles or become disengaged from its mounting.