Strategies for Setup Reduction 251

The class “Strategies for Setup Reduction” presents several common strategies for decreasing setup, the activities required to prepare a product for processing. The single minute exchange of dies (SMED) method, which strives to reduce setups to under 10 minutes, is a core approach to setup reduction. SMED focuses on transitioning internal steps to external steps, which can be performed while machines are running. Additional SMED practices include using setup teams in parallel operations and prepping tools, paperwork, and materials. Standardization and special devices like one-turn and one-touch fasteners and intermediate jigs also help reduce setup times. Setup reduction is one of the many goals of lean manufacturing. Reducing setup times allows manufacturers to perform more setups for smaller, more-varied batches so that they can better respond to customer demands. After taking this class, users should be familiar with methods and understand the importance of setup reduction.

Class Details

Class Name:
Strategies for Setup Reduction 251
Description:
The class “Strategies for Setup Reduction” presents several common strategies for decreasing setup, the activities required to prepare a product for processing. The single minute exchange of dies (SMED) method, which strives to reduce setups to under 10 minutes, is a core approach to setup reduction. SMED focuses on transitioning internal steps to external steps, which can be performed while machines are running. Additional SMED practices include using setup teams in parallel operations and prepping tools, paperwork, and materials. Standardization and special devices like one-turn and one-touch fasteners and intermediate jigs also help reduce setup times. Setup reduction is one of the many goals of lean manufacturing. Reducing setup times allows manufacturers to perform more setups for smaller, more-varied batches so that they can better respond to customer demands. After taking this class, users should be familiar with methods and understand the importance of setup reduction.
Version:
2.0
Difficulty:
Intermediate
Number of Lessons:
20
Related 1.0 Class:
Strategies for Setup Reduction 250

Class Outline

  • Setup Reduction
  • Traditional vs. Lean Manufacturing
  • Single Minute Exchange of Dies
  • Internal vs. External Setup Steps
  • SMED Review
  • Setup Preparation
  • Parallel Operation
  • Parallel Operation: In Action
  • Standardization
  • One-Turn Fasteners
  • One-Turn Fasteners: In Action
  • One-Touch Fasteners
  • Intermediate Jigs
  • Reduction Strategies Review
  • Targeting Setups
  • Timing Setups
  • Timing Setups: In Action
  • Scheduled Changeovers
  • Benefits of Setup Reduction
  • Final Review

Objectives

  • Define setup reduction.
  • Distinguish between traditional and lean manufacturing procedures.
  • Define the concept of single minute exchange of dies.
  • Distinguish between internal and external setup steps.
  • Describe steps involved in setup preparation.
  • Describe parallel operation.
  • Describe setup applications that incorporate standardization.
  • Describe one-turn fasteners.
  • Describe one-touch fasteners.
  • Explain how intermediate jigs are used for setup reduction.
  • Describe strategies for choosing a setup reduction target.
  • Explain the importance of predictable setup times.
  • Describe the purpose of scheduled changeovers.
  • Describe the benefits of setup reduction.

Job Roles

Certifications

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
batch A specific number of the same part that moves through the production cycle. Small batch manufacturers produce a variety of different products but in low volume.
bolt A cylindrical threaded fastener that usually mates with a nut. Bolts typically have blunt ends.
bottlenecks A point of congestion during the production process. Bottlenecks limit the flow of production.
changeover The process of switching a machine from making one type of part to another. Scheduling changeovers helps reduce setup time.
chucks A device that holds a workpiece in place as it rotates. Chucks can be fitted with intermediate jigs to reduce setup time.
clamps Devices used to join, grip, support, or compress mechanical or structural parts. Clamps resist secondary cutting forces during a machining operation.
collets A slitted device that holds a workpiece in place as it rotates. Collets can be fitted with intermediate jigs to reduce setup time.
datums A common reference point for machine tools, programs, and fixtures. A datum can be a hole, line, or any three-dimensional shape.
die A component with specific dimensions used to shape metal that is forced through or against it. Dies require precise positioning to operate correctly.
dies A component with specific dimensions used to shape metal that is forced through or against it. Dies require precise positioning to operate correctly.
economic order quantity EOQ. A traditional non-lean strategy that produces large part runs to minimize production and inventory costs. Economic order quantity is the amount of product needed in order to justify the time necessary for prolonged changeovers.
external step A machine operation or changeover step that can be performed while the machine is still running. An external step adds less time to the setup because production can continue.
fastener A device that holds objects together or locates them in relation to one another. Common fasteners include screws and bolts.
fixtures A customized device that is used to position and hold a workpiece in place. Fixtures are normally used to hold smaller workpieces.
hand clamp A manual device used to join, grip, support, or compress mechanical or structural parts. Hand clamps are operated by squeezing the handles.
hydraulic Using power applied via the motion and pressure of liquids. Some one-touch fasteners are hydraulic.
inspection The examination of a part to determine if it conforms to specifications. Inspection traditionally follows the completion of a part or the components that compose a part.
intermediate jig An interchangeable component that standardizes the locating and support of workholding devices for various machines. Intermediate jigs fit into a sub-plate or main part that does not move.
internal step A machine operation or changeover step that can only be performed when the machine is out of service. An internal step adds the most time to the setup.
jigs A workholding device used to position and hold a workpiece while guiding the location of the cutting tool. Certain jigs help standardize workholding and reduce setup time.
just-in-time manufacturing An approach to production and distribution that emphasizes flexible processes and reduced inventories to decrease costs and improve responsiveness. With just-in-time manufacturing, materials and products are ready precisely when needed.
lathe A machine tool commonly used to create cylindrical forms. A lathe holds a cylindrical workpiece on one or both ends while the cutting tool is gradually passed along the surface of the rotating part.
lean An approach to creating products and services that seeks to reduce the cycle time of processes, increase flexibility, and improve quality. Lean approaches help to eliminate waste in all its forms.
locating The accurate positioning of a part in relation to other known surfaces or distances. In setup reduction, locating is standardized using jigs and sub-plates.
locking pin A one-touch fastener with two balls that extend to hold components together. Locking pins are also called quick release pins.
locking shank A pin or rod used to attach a sub-plate to an intermediate jig. The sub-plate and jig have matching holes through which the shank is inserted.
one-touch fastener A non-threaded attachment that clamps and unclamps with one simple action, such as squeezing a handle or pushing a button. Using one-touch fasteners helps reduce setup time.
one-turn fastener A threaded attachment that clamps and unclamps with one revolution of the threads. Using one-turn fasteners helps reduce setup time.
operating procedure A document describing the established methods for performing a process. This document should also include timing guidelines.
parallel operation The use of two or more people working simultaneously to set up one machine. Parallel operation reduces setup times.
pear-shaped holes A hole with an extended slot on one side to allow for quick tightening and loosening of threaded fasteners. Pear-shaped holes are one-turn fasteners.
quick-release pin A one-touch fastener with two balls that extend to hold components together. Quick release pins are also called locking pins.
scheduled changeovers Machine setup processes that take place according to a calendar instead of in direct response to customer demand. Scheduled changeovers help level and balance production.
screws An externally threaded cylindrical fastener that either fits into a threaded hole or forms threads in a material. Screws may have blunt or pointed ends.
setup The series of tasks necessary to prepare a product for processing. Setup includes preparation, changeover, and adjustments.
setup reduction A lean strategy of systematically eliminating manufacturing setup steps and streamlining those steps that remain. Setup reduction decreases the amount of time needed to changeover a process from the last part of the previous product to the first part of the next product.
shadow board A visual aid used to organize tools and materials. A shadow board contains outlines of designated tools to show where they should be stored.
single minute exchange of dies SMED. A setup reduction practice that strives to reduce machine setup time to less than 10 minutes. Single minute exchange of dies allows for the production of multiple small batches.
speed nut A locking nut with two prongs that act as one thread. Speed nuts are one-turn fasteners.
sub-plate A device that provides precise positioning for multiple standardized intermediate jigs. Sub-plates are mounted and located on a worktable or machine.
support The process of locating from underneath the workpiece. In setup reduction, support is standardized using jigs and sub-plates.
threaded fasteners A fastener that has threads to hold objects together or grip material. Bolts, screws, and nuts are examples of threaded fasteners.
threads Raised helical ridges around the interior or exterior of a cylindrical object. Threads help fasteners grip material and hold components together.
tooling The tools and devices used to machine parts. Setting up tooling can be time-consuming.
U-shaped washers A washer with a slot on one side to allow for quick tightening and loosening of threaded fasteners. U-shaped washers are one-turn fasteners.
value stream map A flow charting method that uses symbols, metrics, and arrows to help visualize processes and track performance. Value stream maps can help identify process areas for improvement.
workholding The process of securely supporting, locating, and clamping a workpiece for a manufacturing operation. Certain workholding devices help reduce setup time.