Band Saw Operation 211

"Band Saw Operation" gives an in-depth description of the considerations required for band sawing operations. Band sawing is a common way to perform rough cuts on raw stock, and uses a continuous, flexible metal blade looped over machine wheels. Band sawing can be performed with a variety of blade materials and styles, including different tooth spacing and geometry. The specific blade type and cutting variables used depend on the specific workpiece and cutting operation.

Band sawing can be an efficient, low-cost way to rough cut stock to size. However, in order to effectively perform band sawing operations, operators must be aware of factors such as blade material, tooth set, tooth form, tooth spacing, and optimal speed and feed settings. This class provides the information necessary to identify optimal band sawing variables and conditions.

Class Details

Class Name:
Band Saw Operation 211
Description:
"Band Saw Operation" gives an in-depth description of the considerations required for band sawing operations. Band sawing is a common way to perform rough cuts on raw stock, and uses a continuous, flexible metal blade looped over machine wheels. Band sawing can be performed with a variety of blade materials and styles, including different tooth spacing and geometry. The specific blade type and cutting variables used depend on the specific workpiece and cutting operation.

Band sawing can be an efficient, low-cost way to rough cut stock to size. However, in order to effectively perform band sawing operations, operators must be aware of factors such as blade material, tooth set, tooth form, tooth spacing, and optimal speed and feed settings. This class provides the information necessary to identify optimal band sawing variables and conditions.
Version:
2.0
Difficulty:
Intermediate
Number of Lessons:
27
Related 1.0 Classes:
Sawing Fundamentals 155, Band Saw Blade Selection 215

Class Outline

  • The Versatility of Sawing
  • Band Sawing
  • Saw Blade Components
  • Saw Blade Component Review
  • Band Saw Teeth
  • Tooth Spacing
  • Tooth Pitch
  • Saw Blade Knowledge Check
  • Saw Tooth Geometry
  • Shear Plane Angle
  • Shear Plane Angle in Action
  • Tooth Form
  • Saw Blade Knowledge Review
  • Tooth Sets
  • The Most Common Tooth Sets
  • Blade Strength and Flexibility
  • Saw Wheels and Operation
  • Band Saw Blade Materials
  • Band Sawing Knowledge Check
  • Cutting Variables for the Band Saw
  • Cutting Variables in Action
  • Speed and Feed Selection for the Band Saw
  • Cutting Width and Precision
  • Reviewing Cutting Variables
  • Band Saw Workholding
  • Breaking In a Blade
  • Final Review

Objectives

  • Describe sawing.
  • Describe band sawing.
  • Identify the different components of a saw blade.
  • Describe the components of saw teeth.
  • Decribe tpi and tpm.
  • Describe tooth pitch.
  • Describe tooth angles. Describe gullet geometry.
  • Explain how shear plane angle affects chip formation.
  • Describe common tooth forms.
  • Describe common tooth sets.
  • Identify the most common tooth sets.
  • Describe the importance of blade strength and flexibility.
  • Describe how band saws move blades through material.
  • Distinguish between common band saw blade materials.
  • Define speed and feed for the band saw.
  • Describe optimal feed and speed conditions for the band saw.
  • Explain how to modify cutting variables for specific workpieces.
  • Describe how workholding affects band saw blade and cutting variable selection.
  • Describe the function and purpose of breaking in a band saw blade.

Certifications

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
alloy steel A steel that contains intentionally added materials that change the property of the metal. Common alloy elements include manganese, molybdenum, and nickel.
alternate A tooth set that has an alternating, left-right sequence. Alternate tooth sets provide high cutting efficiency but poor surface finish.
alternate tooth set A tooth set that has an alternating, left-right sequence. Alternate tooth sets provide high cutting efficiency but poor surface finish.
back The straight portion of a band saw blade that is opposite the tooth edge. The back, or backing, is the saw blade component that does not contain the teeth.
backing The straight portion of a band saw blade that is opposite the tooth edge. The backing, or back, is the saw blade component that does not contain the teeth.
band saws A saw that uses a saw blade constructed from a continuous loop or band of metal. The band saw blade is looped around two or more wheels.
band strength The blade's ability to resist deflection and resistance. Band strength, which is also known as beam strength, is dependent on the blade's width and thickness.
beam strength The blade's ability to resist deflection and resistance. Beam strength, which is also known as band strength, is dependent on the blade's width and thickness.
bi-metal blades A band saw blade made from two pieces of alloy steel that are welded together. Bi-metal blades have a flexible back but hard teeth.
blade guides A device, often part of a set, used to keep a band saw blade moving on a specific track or path. Blade guides increase the precision of band saw cuts.
carbide blades A band saw blade that has a steel back and very hard carbide tooth tips. Carbide blades are created by welding carbide to the saw teeth and then grinding them into shape.
carbon steel blades A band saw blade made out of a single piece of steel. Carbon steel blades are generally the least expensive.
cast aluminum Aluminum that is poured as a liquid into a mold and cooled into a solid shape. Cast aluminum is easily machined.
chip An unwanted piece of metal that is removed from a workpiece. Chips are formed when a tool cuts or grinds metal.
circular sawing The use of a round saw blade with teeth around its perimeter. Circular sawing rotates the blade at high speeds to cut through metal.
compression A pushing or pressing force that is directed toward the center of an object and attempts to squeeze it. Compression can cause a band saw blade to curve or arc.
contouring band saws A type of band saw equipped with a table that can tilt to cut irregular shapes. Contouring band saws can cut a wider variety of shapes than traditional band saws.
cut-off operations A shearing process that performs a single cut in order to separate a piece of metal from the original stock. Each cut in a cut-off operation separates a new part.
discontinuous chips A chip that easily fractures from the workpiece into small, separate pieces. Brittle metals tend to create discontinuous chips.
drive wheel The component of a band saw's pulley-like drive system that actively turns to propel the blade forward. The drive wheel power's the blade's movement.
feed The rate at which the saw blade moves into the material as it cuts. The feed of a cut has an inverse relationship with the speed of the cut.
feed rates The rate at which the saw blade moves into the material as it cuts. Feed rates often involve linear movement from one point to another and are measured in inches per minute.
friction blades A saw blade made with one piece of carbon steel. Friction blades are used at high speeds to soften metal for removal.
gage The side-to-side thickness of a band saw blade. Blade gage contributes to the width of the saw's cut.
gullet The curved area between two saw teeth into which the chip curls. Gullet shape depends on the saw blade teeth.
gullet capacity A measurement of the largest chip that can curl in the gullet area before the chip becomes deformed. Gullet capacity affects cut quality and blade life.
gullet depth The distance from the tooth tip to the bottom of the gullet. Gullet depth is a component of tooth shape and gullet capacity.
hacksawing The use of a long blade mounted in a bow-shaped frame. Hacksawing takes place using a reciprocating, or back-and-forth, motion.
hard-edge, flexible-back blades A saw blade made with one piece of carbon steel with a heat-treated tooth edge. Hard-edge, flexible-back blades are a type of carbon steel blade.
hard-edge, hard-back blades A saw blade made with one piece of heat-treated carbon steel. Hard-edge, flexible-back blades are a type of carbon steel blade.
hardness A material's ability to resist penetration, indentation, or scratching. Hardness is a necessary property of cutting tools.
hardness The ability of a material to resist scratching, indentation, or penetration. Workpiece materials with increased hardness generate more heat and are more difficult to machine.
high-speed steel HSS. A common cutting tool material that is relatively inexpensive and offers excellent toughness. High-speed steel is used for the teeth of bi-metal saw blades.
hook tooth form A tooth form that has evenly spaced teeth, wide gullets, and a positive rake angle.
idler wheel The unpowered component of a band saw's pulley-like system that turns the blade. The idler wheel's primary purpose is to guide the blade.
kerf The slot made by a band saw as it cuts. Kerf also refers to the width or dimensions of that slot.
machinability The ability of a metal to be cut and shaped by machine processes such as cutting, grinding, turning, or drilling. Machinability indicates the relative ease with which a metal can be machined.
pinch back An unwanted effect that occurs when the slot being cut by a saw blade closes over the blade. Pinch back can be prevented by widening the cut.
radius cuts A curved or contoured cut. Radius cut size can be limited by the blade-width.
raker A tooth set that has a uniform set angle and a three tooth set sequence of left, right, and straight. Raker tooth sets balance cutting efficiency and surface finish.
raker tooth set A tooth set that has a uniform set angle and a three tooth set sequence of left, right, and straight. Raker tooth sets balance cutting efficiency and surface finish.
sawing A basic, chip-producing cutting process that uses a blade set with a series of teeth on its edge to cut a narrow opening in a workpiece. Sawing may be used to produce slots or grooves or to separate the workpiece into two pieces.
set The degree to which band saw teeth are bent out to the side. Tooth set is used to widen the cut and prevent pinching of the saw blade.
shear plane angle The angle at which the work material shears off. Shear plane angle largely determines chip type and thickness.
shears To cut off sheet or bar metal between two blades. In sawing, shearing a material creates long, curling, continuous chips.
skip positive tooth form A tooth form that has evenly spaced teeth, wide gullets, and a positive rake angle.
skip tooth form A tooth form that has evenly spaced teeth, wide gullets, and a zero-degree rake angle.
speed The rate at which the blade cuts across the face of the material. The speed with which a material can be cut is affected by the material's hardness.
spring steel alloy A type of alloy steel that has both hardness and yield strength. Spring steel alloys are used in bi-metal saw blades.
standard tooth form A tooth form that has evenly spaced teeth, deep gullets, and a zero-degree rake angle.
steel A metal consisting of iron and up to 2.11% carbon, usually with small amounts of trace elements. Steel is the most common metal in manufacturing.
stock Raw material that is used to make manufactured parts. Stock is available in shapes such as bars, plates, or sheets.
teeth per inch tpi. The amount of teeth or portions of band saw teeth that are found in an inch. Teeth per inch is the English equivalent of teeth per millimenter, and it is an important variable in saw blade selection.
teeth per millimeter tpm. The amount of teeth or portions of band saw teeth that are found in a millimeter. Teeth per millimeter is the metric equivalent of teeth per inch, and it is an important variable in saw blade selection.
tip The point of the saw blade tooth that digs in and cuts into the workpiece. Tips perform the cutting action.
titanium A silver-gray, strong, but lightweight nonferrous metal. Titanium has a high strength-to-weight ratio, excellent flexibility, and exceptional corrosion resistance.
tooth back The rear side of a saw blade tooth facing away from the direction of the cut. The tooth back helps to form the gullet.
tooth back clearance angle The angle that measures the amount of space, or clearance, between the tooth back and the workpiece. The tooth back clearance angle is formed between the tooth back and the workpiece surface.
tooth face The front side of a saw blade tooth, facing toward the direction of the cut. The tooth face is the surface onto which chips flow during the cut.
tooth form The shape, spacing, and geometry of a saw tooth. Tooth forms occur in repeating patterns.
tooth forms The shape, spacing, and geometry of a saw tooth. Tooth forms occur in repeating patterns.
tooth pitch The space between the band saw teeth as measured from tooth tip to tooth tip. Tooth pitch is an important variable in saw blade selection.
tooth rake angle The angle formed by the tooth face and a line perpendicular to the back of the blade. Tooth rake angles measure the angle of the tooth face.
tooth set The bending of band saw teeth outward to the side. Tooth set is used to widen the cut and prevent pinching of the saw blade.
tooth sets The bending of band saw teeth outward to the side. Tooth set is used to widen the cut and prevent pinching of the saw blade.
tungsten carbide A compound of tungsten and carbon. Tungsten carbide offers excellent hardness and wear resistance.
variable positive tooth form A tooth form that has irregular tooth spacing, varying gullet depth, and a positive rake angle.
variable tooth form A tooth form that has irregular tooth spacing, standard tooth forms, varying gullet depth, and a zero-degree rake angle.
wavy A tooth set that has groups of teeth set on one side and then the other. Wavy tooth sets can handle the strain of interrupted cuts.
wavy tooth set A tooth set that has groups of teeth arranged on one side and then the other. Wavy tooth sets can handle the strain of interrupted cuts.
width The measurement from the tip of a band saw blade tooth to the back of the blade. Blade width includes the blade teeth and back.
workholding device A device used to support, locate, and hold a workpiece for manufacturing purposes. The workholding device establishes a relationship between the cutting tool and the workpiece.