Additive Manufacturing Safety 120

Additive Manufacturing Safety describes how users can protect themselves against common mechanical, electrical, thermal, and airborne hazards associated with AM processes. This class also provides an overview of personal protective equipment (PPE), lockout/tagout procedures, Hazard Communication Standards (HCS), and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

CLASS DETAILS

Class Name:
Additive Manufacturing Safety 120
Description:
Additive Manufacturing Safety describes how users can protect themselves against common mechanical, electrical, thermal, and airborne hazards associated with AM processes. This class also provides an overview of personal protective equipment (PPE), lockout/tagout procedures, Hazard Communication Standards (HCS), and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).
Version:
1.0
Difficulty:
Beginner
Number of Lessons:
11
Additional Language:
Spanish

Class Outline

  • Objectives
  • The Importance of Additive Manufacturing Safety
  • Common AM Methods
  • Mechanical and Electrical Hazards
  • Thermal Hazards
  • Airborne Particles
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Hazard Communication and Labeling
  • Understanding Safety Data Sheets
  • Maintenance and Lockout/Tag-out
  • Summary

Objectives

  • Describe the importance of additive manufacturing safety.
  • Define common AM methods.
  • Describe AM mechanical and electrical hazards.
  • Describe AM thermal hazards.
  • Describe AM airborne emissions hazards.
  • Describe different types of personal protective equipment.
  • Describe the information on a HCS label.
  • Describe Safety Data Sheets.
  • Describe lockout/tag-out procedures.

Job Roles

Certifications

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
ABS Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene. A thermoplastic material used to make filaments for additive manufacturing applications. ABS can emit potentially hazardous ultrafine particles when heated.
adaptors A device that converts AC electrical current to DC current. Small additive manufacturing machines may include power cords and adaptors for connecting the machine to an electrical outlet.
additive manufacturing AM. The process of joining or solidifying materials to make an object based on a three-dimensional computer model. Additive manufacturing methods typically build up layers of material to create an object.
AM Additive manufacturing. The process of joining or solidifying materials to make an object based on a three-dimensional computer model. Additive manufacturing methods typically build up layers of material to create an object.
bump cap A lightweight, protective head covering used in areas of low clearance. Bump caps provide minimal protection from minor impacts and abrasions.
circuit A controlled path for electricity. A circuit includes a source, path, load, and control.
combustible Any substance that is capable of igniting and burning. Some additive manufacturing process use combustible materials or generate combustible byproducts.
composite A material made by combining a binding resin with small filaments of solid material. Composites are made by combining different types of manufacturing materials, including metal, plastic, or ceramic.
curing oven Equipment that heats material in order to harden and dry it. Some additive manufacturing objects must be cured after the initial build phase.
current The flow of electricity through a circuit. Current is measured in amperes , or "amps."
direct metal laser sintering DMLS. An additive manufacturing process that uses a laser to bond areas in a bed of powdered metal. DMLS is a discrete particle method.
DMLS Direct metal laser sintering. An additive manufacturing process that uses a laser to bond areas in a bed of powdered metal. DMLS is a discrete particle method.
dust mask Protective nose and mouth covers that reduce inhalation of airborne particles. Dust masks are a type of personal protective equipment (PPE).
earmuffs A protective device that covers the entire outer ear to block nose and prevent debris from entering the ear.
earplugs A protective device that is inserted in the ear to block noise. Earplugs can be made from wax, cotton, foam, silicone, or rubber.
electrical shock The flow of electricity that occurs when a part of the human body contacts a source of electricity. Electrical shock can be fatal.
energy-isolating mechanism A mechanical device that physically prevents the transmission or release of energy, such as a circuit breaker or valve. Lockout devices cover the energy-isolating mechanism or keep it in the "off" position.
extrusion A forming process that forces material through a die or nozzle. Some additive manufacturing processes use extrusion to deposit material onto a build platform.
face shield A protective device that guards the face and eyes from debris. Face shields can also be designed to protect users from intense light or radiation.
FDM Fused deposition modeling. An additive manufacturing process that builds objects by extruding layers of material. FDM usually uses thermoplastic materials.
flammable A material that can easily ignite and start a fire. Flammable workplace chemicals must be labeled with HCS labels.
flexible wiring A type of movable wiring such as an extension cord that is not meant for permanent use.
fused deposition modeling FDM. An additive manufacturing process that builds objects by extruding layers of material. FDM usually uses thermoplastic materials.
goggles Tight-fitting eye protection that completely covers the eyes, eye sockets, and surrounding facial area. Goggles offer protection from impact, debris, and splashes.
hard hat A lightweight head covering that protects against impact, low-clearance areas, and electrical shock. Hard hats are usually made of plastic.
Hazard Communication Standard HCS. An established OSHA policy that sets guidelines for hazard communication. The HCS emphasizes labeling, SDS, and training, and is aligned with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS).
HCS Hazard Communication Standard. An established OSHA policy that sets guidelines for hazard communication. The HCS emphasizes labeling, SDS, and training, and is aligned with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS).
heating element A device that heats a component when activated. Some additive manufacturing systems use heating elements to melt raw materials.
lockout device  A safety device that holds an energy isolating device in the safe or "off" position or covers the switch so that it is inaccessible. Lockouts are typically used with tag-out devices.
lockout/tag-out A method of protecting employees from accidental machine startup through proper locking and labeling of machines that are hazardous to nearby employees.
machining The process of removing material to form an object. Traditional machining methods such as milling, turning, and drilling remove metal using cutting tools.
maintenance The necessary and basic support and repair of machines. Maintenance helps to reduce machine breakdowns and ensure user safety.
nanoscale A range measuring between one and 100 nanometers. Some additive manufacturing processes create fine nanoscale particles.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA. A government agency that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States to ensure that employees work in safe and healthy environments.
OSHA Occupational Health and Safety Administration. A government agency that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States to ensure that employees work in safe and healthy environments.
personal protective equipment PPE. Articles of clothing or safeguarding devices that workers use to prevent injury in the workplace. Safety glasses, insulated gloves, face masks, and earplugs are examples of PPE.
plastic A synthetic polymer characterized by light weight, good formability, and high corrosion resistance. Thermoplastics and thermosets are the two main categories of plastic materials.
polymer A material having long chains of large, linked molecules. Plastics are synthetic polymer.
PPE Personal protective equipment. Articles of clothing or safeguarding devices that workers use to prevent injury in the workplace. Safety glasses, insulated gloves, face masks, and earplugs are examples of PPE.
protective gloves Coverings that protect the hands and arms from heat, chemical exposure, or sharp surfaces. Protective gloves can be made from leather, rubber, or other material, depending on the hazard the hazard they are designed to guard against.
radiation Energy emitted in the form of particles or waves. Prolonged exposure to radiation can cause serious health problems.
respirators A breathing device worn to prevent inhalation of particles and hazardous substances. Respirators may purify air from the environment or supply air to the wearer.
Safety Data Sheet SDS. Mandatory documents that must accompany every chemical in the workplace. A SDS includes information such as the hazards, precautions, and first-aid procedures associated with the chemical.
safety glasses Protective eyewear that shields the eyes from debris. Safety glasses are a type of personal protective equipment (PPE).
safety shoes Footwear that protect the feet from impact and heat. Safety shoes are a type of personal protective equipment (PPE).
SDS Safety Data Sheet. Mandatory documents that must accompany every chemical in the workplace. A SDS includes information such as the hazards, precautions, and first-aid procedures associated with the chemical.
selective laser sintering SLS. An additive manufacturing process that uses a laser to bond areas of material in a powdered bed. SLS is a discrete particle method.
sheet lamination An additive manufacturing process that forms an object by bonding sheets of material together using an adhesive, heat, and pressure.
shin guards A device that fits over the lower legs to protect against heat, impact, and other hazards. Shin guards are often made from leather or plastic.
SLS Selective laser sintering. An additive manufacturing process that uses a laser to bond areas of material in a powdered bed. SLS is a discrete particle method.
solvent A chemical substance used to dissolve another material. Some additive manufacturing processes use liquid solvents to remove support material after the build.
stainless steel A type of steel that contains more than 15% chromium. Stainless steel exhibits excellent corrosion resistance.
tag-out device A prominent warning device attached to a machine or power source so that employees know that the equipment is undergoing service and should remain off. Tag-outs are usually used with lockout devices.
thermal energy Energy in the form of heat. Thermal energy sources used in additive manufacturing systems include lasers and UV light.
thermoplastic A type of synthetic polymer that can be repeatedly heated and shaped. Thermoplastics are often used in additive manufacturing extrusion methods.
titanium A nonferrous metal that is lightweight, corrosion resistant, and has a high strength-to-weight ratio. Titanium is often used in the aerospace industry.
toe guards A device that fits over the toes of regular shoes to protect toes from being crushed. Toe guards can be made from aluminum, steel, or plastic.
UFP Ultrafine particle. Microscopic airborne particulates from natural or industrial sources. Inhaling ultrafine particles created when heating thermoplastic can lead to respiratory and nervous system problems.
ultrafine particle UFP. Microscopic airborne particulates from natural or industrial sources. Inhaling ultrafine particles created when heating thermoplastic can lead to respiratory and nervous system problems.
ultraviolet UV. Light not visible to the naked eye because it consists of wavelengths shorter than those of visible light. Some additive manufacturing systems use UV light to bond or cure materials.
UV Ultraviolet. Light not visible to the naked eye because it consists of wavelengths shorter than those of visible light. Some additive manufacturing systems use UV light to bond or cure materials.
voltage A measure of electrical pressure or potential. Contact with high-voltage electricity can be fatal.