PPE for Welding 111

“PPE for Welding” introduces the purpose and uses of personal protective equipment (PPE) for welders. Welding hazards include electric shock, fume and gas exposure, arc radiation, and fire and explosion. Welders are most likely to sustain burns to the skin or eyes. OSHA and ANSI issue standards for PPE. To prevent injury, welders should wear appropriate PPE to cover all exposed skin, including safety glasses or goggles, a welding helmet, hearing protection, welding gloves, and leather high-top shoes. Welding PPE should be fire resistant, protect the eyes from harmful light, fit comfortably, and provide adequate protection. Employers must train employees in proper PPE use and complete a hazard assessment.

Proper PPE not only protects workers from injury, but helps prevent productivity loss due to sick time and ensures that workplaces are OSHA compliant. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the PPE necessary to perform welding operations safely.

Class Details

Class Name:
PPE for Welding 111
Description:
“PPE for Welding” introduces the purpose and uses of personal protective equipment (PPE) for welders. Welding hazards include electric shock, fume and gas exposure, arc radiation, and fire and explosion. Welders are most likely to sustain burns to the skin or eyes. OSHA and ANSI issue standards for PPE. To prevent injury, welders should wear appropriate PPE to cover all exposed skin, including safety glasses or goggles, a welding helmet, hearing protection, welding gloves, and leather high-top shoes. Welding PPE should be fire resistant, protect the eyes from harmful light, fit comfortably, and provide adequate protection. Employers must train employees in proper PPE use and complete a hazard assessment.

Proper PPE not only protects workers from injury, but helps prevent productivity loss due to sick time and ensures that workplaces are OSHA compliant. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the PPE necessary to perform welding operations safely.
Version:
2.0
Difficulty:
Beginner
Number of Lessons:
14

Class Outline

  • Welding Safety Concerns
  • PPE Selection
  • PPE Training
  • Protective Clothing Basics
  • Types of Protective Clothing
  • Protective Clothing Review
  • Eye Protection
  • Face and Head Protection
  • Helmet Lens Shading
  • Eye, Face, and Head Protection
  • Ear Protection
  • Gloves
  • Foot and Leg Protection
  • Welding Hazards and PPE

Objectives

  • Explain why welding requires personal protective equipment.
  • Describe the standards and requirements for welding PPE.
  • Describe OSHA training requirements.
  • Describe the characteristics of different materials used in welding PPE.
  • Distinguish between the types of protective clothing required when welding.
  • Describe the proper uses of common types of eye protection for welding.
  • Describe the common types of face and head protection for welding.
  • Describe the shade number classification for welding helmet lenses.
  • Explain the need for hearing protection during welding.
  • Explain the importance of wearing welding gloves.
  • Describe the common types of foot and leg protection for welding.

Job Roles

Certifications

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
American National Standards Institute ANSI. A private, non-profit organization that administers the U.S. voluntary standards and conformity assessment system. ANSI provides a process for industry groups to create and publish the specifications for some PPE.
amperage A unit of measurement that indicates the amount of current flowing in a circuit. A weld using a higher amperage requires a higher lens shade number.
ANSI American National Standards Institute. A private, non-profit organization that administers the U.S. voluntary standards and conformity assessment system. ANSI provides a process for industry groups to create and publish the specifications for some PPE.
apron A fabric or leather body covering that ties over the neck and behind the back. Aprons protect the front of the body from chest to knee.
aprons A fabric or leather body covering that ties over the neck and behind the back. Aprons protect the front of the body from chest to knee.
arc The area through which electricity moves between a welding electrode and workpiece. The arc generates heat that melts the base metals and filler metal during welding.
arc radiation The emission of ultraviolet and infrared rays produced during arc welding. Arc radiation can burn eyes and skin.
arc welding A welding process that uses electricity to generate the heat needed to melt and join base metals. Arc welding can cause damage to skin and eyes.
arm coverings A fabric or leather sleeve that fits over the arm to protect from various hazards. Arm coverings shield workers from heat, sparks, or splashes from chemicals or molten materials.
bib A piece of fabric or leather that attaches to a shoulder cape to provide additional coverage of the chest and abdomen. Bibs are detachable.
coveralls A full flame resistant suit worn over existing clothing. Coveralls protect the arms, neck, shoulders, chest, abdomen, back, and legs.
decibels A unit of measurement that indicates the intensity of sound. If occupational noise reaches or exceeds 85 decibels over an eight-hour period, employees must wear hearing protection.
earmuffs Full-ear coverings that are connected by a headband and create a perfect seal around the ear. Unless specially designed, earmuffs may interfere with wearing a welding helmet.
earplugs Hearing protection made of silicone or rubber designed to fit in the ear. Earplugs can be single-use, or they can be pre-formed for long-term use.
fire-resistance rated FR rated. Treated to slow the formation and spread of flames. FR rated clothing will not ignite and continue to burn like normal clothing.
Fire-resistant synthetic materials A manufactured synthetic textile that is flame retardant. Fire resistant synthetic material is light weight and cooler to wear.
fit testing An evaluation of the way in which personal protective equipment fits the wearer. Fit testing is required annually for respirators and other types of PPE.
FR rated Fire-resistance rated. Treated to slow the formation and spread of flames. FR rated clothing will not ignite and continue to burn like normal clothing.
gas cutting A process that uses a flame produced by fuel gases and oxygen to cut metal. Gas cutting requires a lens shade number between 6 and 7.
goggles Tight-fitting eye protection that completely covers the eyes, the eye sockets, and the surrounding facial area. Goggles offer protection from impact, dust, and spatter.
hard hat A lightweight, protective head covering used to protect the head from impacts, bumps, and electrical shock. Hard hats have a shock-absorbing lining with a headband and straps that suspend the shell away from the skull.
hazard assessment A written, formal appraisal of the safety risks that exist within a workplace. A hazard assessment is often used to determine appropriate types of PPE.
hazardous breathing environment Air that is contaminated with dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors. Employees must wear respirators when working in hazardous breathing environments.
hazards A source of danger or possible injury. Hazards can be physical hazards like falling objects or health hazards like chemical exposures.
hearing conservation program A formal program that consists of several standards intended to prevent worker hearing loss. A hearing conservation program must include noise evaluations, hearing tests, and hearing protection.
infrared rays An invisible emission of energy that occurs during heating processes such as arc welding. Infrared rays can damage vision.
leather A fabric made from cow hide that offers a natural resistance to heat and flames. Leather is often used as a material for welding protective clothing.
leggings Lower leg coverings made of leather or fabric that protect the legs from sparks and spatter. Leggings snap off and on for quick removal.
metatarsal guards A device that straps onto the shoe to protect the instep from impacts and crushing. Metatarsal guards may be made from aluminum, steel, plastic, or fabric.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA. A government agency under the U.S. Dept. of Labor that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States. OSHA ensures that employees work in safe and healthy environments.
OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration. A government agency under the U.S. Dept. of Labor that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States. OSHA ensures that employees work in safe and healthy environments.
overalls A flame-resistant pair of pants with an attached bib. Overalls protect the chest, abdomen, and legs.
oxyfuel welding A type of welding that uses a flame produced by fuel gases and oxygen to melt and join base metals. Oxyfuel welding requires a lens shade number between 5 and 9.
personal protective equipment PPE. Any example of safety equipment that workers wear or use to prevent injury in the workplace. Common PPE includes safety glasses, welding helmets, and hearing protection.
powered air purifying respirator PAPR. A form of PPE with an air-purifying filter, cartridge, or canister that removes specific air contaminants. PAPR welding helmets are required for breathing when welding in a hazardous breathing environment.
PPE Personal protective equipment. Any example of various safety equipment that workers wear or use to prevent injury in the workplace. Common PPE includes safety glasses, welding helmets, and hearing protection.
requirements A specific mandate that is contained in an OSHA standard. Employers must meet requirements to be considered compliant with OSHA safety standards.
respirator A breathing device worn to prevent inhalation of hazardous substances. Respirators may purify air or supply air for the wearer.
safety glasses Protective eyeglasses with metal or plastic frames and impact-resistant lenses that may or may not offer vision correction. Safety glasses worn for welding applications must also have protective side shields.
safety-toed boots Protective footwear with a reinforced toe area. Safety-toed boots prevent foot injury from falling objects.
shade number A number that denotes the darkness of the lens in a welding helmet. Different shade numbers are recommended for different welding operations.
shoulder capes A fabric or leather body covering that protects the arms, shoulders, chest, neck, and upper back. Shoulder capes drape over the body to allow unrestricted movement.
spatter Molten metal spray produced during welding operations. Spatter can land on a welder and cause burns.
spot welding A type of welding in which parts are squeezed together between two electrodes and subjected to a large amount of electric current to form a joint. Spot welding requires a lens shade number between 1 and 4.
standards An established policy on a particular practice or method. OSHA standards have the same power as law, and non-compliance can result in fines and other penalties.
treated cotton Fabric that is made from cotton plants and has chemical additives to change its properties. Treated cotton used for welding protective clothing must be fire resistant.
treated wool A naturally flame resistant fabric that is made from sheep hair and includes chemical additives to change its properties. Treated wool is fire-resistance rated.
ultraviolet rays UV rays. An invisible emission of energy produced by sources such as welding arcs. UV rays can damage vision and burn skin.
welding cap A protective head covering that protects a welder from burns due to sparks and spatter. Welding caps are worn under a welding helmet and are made from fire-resistance rated material.
welding gloves A type of hand and wrist covering used to protect the skin from welding hazards. Welding gloves are made from leather or other FR rated material.
welding gloves A type of protective hand and wrist covering used to protect the skin from welding hazards. Welding gloves are made from leather or other FR rated material.
welding helmets A heat-resistant head covering that protects against burns and eye damage. Welding helmets prevent burns from spatter and sparks and contain a darkened lens to protect the eyes from the welding arc.
welding jacket A light-weight coat made of flame resistant material worn to protect the upper body. Welding jackets cover the arms, chest, and back.
welding shields A heat-resistant face covering that protects against burns and eye damage. Welding shields prevent burns from spatter and sparks and contain a darkened lens to protect the eyes from the welding arc.