Intro to Fastener Ergonomics 130

This class introduces ergonomics and discusses the ergonomic concerns associated with assembly.

Class Details

Class Name:
Intro to Fastener Ergonomics 130
Description:
This class introduces ergonomics and discusses the ergonomic concerns associated with assembly.
Version:
1.0
Difficulty:
Beginner
Number of Lessons:
15
Additional Language:
Spanish

Class Outline

  • Objectives
  • What Is Ergonomics?
  • The Importance of Good Posture
  • Repetition
  • Force
  • The Importance of Workstation Design
  • Sitting Workstations
  • Standing Workstations
  • Tool Balancers and Tool Positioners
  • Torque Reaction
  • Power Tool Ergonomics
  • Screwdriver Ergonomics
  • Impact Wrench and Pulse Tool Ergonomics
  • The Disadvantages of Ergonomics
  • Summary

Objectives

  • Define ergonomics.
  • Explain the importance of good posture.
  • Describe ergonomic practices to avoid the negative effects of repetition.
  • Describe ergonomic practices to avoid the negative effects of excess force.
  • Explain the importance of workstation design.
  • Describe ergonomic practices to avoid the negative effects of sitting workstations.
  • Describe ergonomic practices to avoid the negative effects of standing workstations.
  • Distinguish between tool balancers and tool positioners.
  • Describe the characteristics of torque reaction.
  • Describe ergonomic practices to avoid the negative effects of using power tools.
  • Describe ergonomic practices to avoid the negative effects of using screwdrivers.
  • Describe ergonomic practices to avoid the negative effects of using impact wrenches and pulse tools.
  • Describe the disadvantages of ergonomics.

Job Roles

Certifications

NIMS
  • Job Planning, Benchwork, & Layout I
MSSC
  • MSSC Safety

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
clutch A coupling found inside a motorized device that engages or disengages parts to drive the mechanism.
ergonomics The study of designing devices to decrease operator discomfort or fatigue and increase productivity.
force The push or pull that gives energy to an object. Assemblers exerting excessive force is an ergonomic concern.
forklift A small vehicle used in manufacturing that contains a platform for lifting and transporting heavy loads.
grip The way in which an object, such as a screwdriving tool, is grasped. Tools are designed with different grips to accommodate specific tasks.
hard joint A joint in which less than a 30° turn will take the fastener from fitting snugly to reaching torque.
impact wrench A screwdriving tool that uses a discontinuous drive clutch and compressed air to achieve torque. Impact wrenches are often used to tighten lug nuts on cars when changing a tire.
parts bin A device used to hold parts or supplies. Parts bins are usually on wheels so they can be easily transported around a shop.
personal protection equipment Any of various articles of clothing or safeguarding devices that assemblers or operators are required to wear. Personal protection equipment (PPE) varies from shop to shop.
pistol-grip tool A tool that has a grip shaped to fit the hand. Pistol-grip tools are typically recommended for vertical projects.
power-to-weight ratio The power the tool generates divided by the weight of the tool.
pulse tool A screwdriving tool that uses a discontinuous drive clutch and hydraulics to generate torque. Pulse tools are common for applications that use large bolts.
push-start screwdriver A screwdriving tool that is powered when it is pushed against a joint.
screwdriving tool A tool that assembles a screw into a joint. Screwdriving tools can be manual or powered by compressed air, electricity, or batteries.
sitting workstation A workplace in which assemblers perform their tasks sitting down.
standing workstation A workplace in which assemblers perform their tasks standing up.
straight-grip tool A tool that has a barrel-like grip. Straight-grip tools are typically recommended for horizontal projects.
tool balancer A device that suspends a tool above the workstation using a retractable cord. Tool balancers are ergonomic and reduce clutter.
tool positioner A device that suspends a tool just above the components using an adjustable bar or rod.
torque The amount of force applied to tighten a threaded fastener.
torque reaction The jerk an assembler can feel in the hand and/or arm when a fastening tool reaches torque. Torque reaction is an ergonomic concern.
torque-absorbing arm An attachment used with a fastening tool that absorbs torque reaction so the assembler can avoid injury.