What is the definition of "reference tool"?
The tool in the turret to which all the other tools are compared when setting geometry offsets. The reference tool does not require a geometry offset because its exact location is already stored as the workshift offset.

Learn more about reference tool in the class CNC Offsets 210 below.


CNC Training


Class Information
CNC Training Tooling U-SME classes are offered at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. The typical class consists of 12 to 25 lessons and will take approximately one hour to complete.
Class Name:CNC Offsets 210
Description:This class identifies the various offsets used on both the lathe and the mill to properly reference each cutting tool in relationship to the workpiece. Includes an Interactive Lab.
Prerequisites: 300120  300130  300200 
Difficulty:Intermediate
Number of Lessons:18
Language:English, Spanish, Chinese
 
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Class Outline
  • Objectives
  • The Purpose of Offsets
  • Machine and Program Zero for Turning
  • Offsets for the Turning Center
  • Workshift Offsets
  • Using a Reference Tool
  • Geometry Offsets
  • Wear Offsets
  • Offset Features for Turning
  • Machine and Program Zero for Milling
  • Offsets for the Machining Center
  • Workshift Offsets
  • Tool Length Offsets
  • Tool Length Offset Methods
  • Cutter Radius Compensation
  • Offset Features for Milling
  • Recognizing Tool Wear
  • Summary
  
Class Objectives
  • Describe the role of offsets.
  • Distinguish between machine and program zero on the turning center.
  • Identify offsets for the turning center.
  • Define workshift offset for the turning center.
  • Describe the use of a reference tool.
  • Define geometry offset for the turning center.
  • Identify wear offsets for the turning center.
  • Describe the toolset probe.
  • Describe the use of tool nose radius compensation.
  • Distinguish between machine and program zero on the machining center.
  • Define offsets for the machining center.
  • Define workshift offset for the machining center.
  • Define tool length offset for the machining center.
  • Identify how to determine tool length offset.
  • Define cutter radius compensation.
  • Describe wear offsets for the machining center.
  • Identify the importance of tool wear.

Class Vocabulary

Vocabulary TermDefinition
1-2-3 block A precise metal block with dimensions measuring one, two, and three inches long respectively.
chamfering Machining an angled edge around the end of a cylindrical workpiece.
contour A curved surface or dimension that is cut into a workpiece.
contouring Tool movement along two or more axes at the same time that creates a curved surface.
cutter radius compensation An offset used on the machining center that accounts for variations in tool diameter. CRC is only necessary for tools that continuously cut along a horizontal plane.
edge finder A device used on a machining center to locate the exact position of a part edge along the X-axis or Y-axis.
flange A ring or collar surrounding the toolholder that allows the tool to be grasped by the toolchanger.
G code A programming code that determines the type of operation performed on the machine.
gage line The imaginary line marking the portion of the toolholder that matches the bottom edge of the machine spindle.
geometry offset An offset used on a turning center to account for the setup and geometry of a specific tool held in the turret. Each tool requires its own geometry offset.
machine zero The position located at the farthest possible distance in a positive direction along the machine axes. This position is permanently set for each particular CNC machine.
machining center A sophisticated CNC machine that can perform milling, drilling, tapping, and boring operations at the same location with a variety of tools.
offset A numerical value stored in the CNC controls that repositions machine components. Offsets are used to adjust for variations in tool geometry, part size, tool wear, etc.
origin The central point in a coordinate system. The origin has a numerical value of zero.
pocket An interior recess that is cut into the surface of a workpiece.
program zero The position that acts as the origin for the part program of a particular workpiece. This position is unique to each workpiece design, and it is selected by the part programmer.
reference tool The tool in the turret to which all the other tools are compared when setting geometry offsets. The reference tool does not require a geometry offset because its exact location is already stored as the workshift offset.
referencing Locating a tool, workpiece, or machine component in a known position.
slot A narrow channel cut into the surface of a workpiece.
taper A shape with a gradually decreasing diameter, similar to the shape of a cone.
tool length offset An offset used on the machining center that accounts for variations in tool length along the Z-axis. Each tool requires its own offset, which is measured from the tip of the tool to the gage line.
tool nose radius compensation An offset feature used on a turning center that slightly shifts the toolpath for the rounded tip of an insert during contouring, chamfering, and other multi-axis operations.
toolset probe A device on a turning center that swings into position and acts as a point for touching off tools to quickly calculate their geometry offsets. Toolset probes help to reduce setup time.
touches off To determine the exact location of a tool tip by touching it against an object with a known measurement.
turning center A sophisticated CNC machine that specializes in turning, boring, drilling, and threading operations, all at the same location.
wear offset An offset used on a turning center and some machining centers that allows for the slight adjustment of tool tip location. Wear offsets account for part deflection, tool wear, etc.
workshift offset An offset used to adjust the location of every tool loaded in the machine. Workshift offsets change the position of the turret on a turning center and the spindle on a machining center.
X-axis For turning, the linear axis describing turret motion toward and away from the spindle centerline. For milling, the linear axis describing the horizontal left and right motion of the cutting tool or worktable.
Y-axis The linear axis that describes horizontal tool motion on the machining center toward and away from the operator.
Z-axis The linear axis that describes motions along a line parallel to the spindle.