What is the definition of "M code"?
A code used to signal an action from a miscellaneous group of commands. M codes change cutting tools, turn on or turn off the coolant, spindle, or workpiece clamps, etc.

Learn more about M code in the class Creating a Turning Program 280 below.


CNC Training


Class Information
Tooling U-SME classes are offered at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. The typical class consists of 12 to 25 lessons and will take approximately one hour to complete.
Class Name:Creating a Turning Program 280
Description:This class explains the key components in the creation and execution of a simple turning program. Includes an Interactive Lab.
Prerequisites: 300150  300210 
Difficulty:Intermediate
Number of Lessons:17
Language:English, Spanish, Chinese
 
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Class Outline
  • Objectives
  • Manual Programming for CNC
  • A Sample Turning Program
  • The Types of Motion
  • Programming Tool Movements
  • The Facing and Rough Turn Path
  • Speed and Feed Modes
  • The Drilling Path
  • Startup Codes
  • Tool Changes and Optional Stops
  • The Boring Path
  • The Rough Turn Canned Cycle
  • The Finish Turning Path
  • The Peck Drill Canned Cycle
  • Using a Template
  • Proving Out
  • Summary
  
Class Objectives
  • Identify the major steps in the part creation process.
  • Describe a toolpath.
  • Identify the codes for each mode of motion.
  • Identify how absolute coordinates translate into code.
  • Interpret a G01 block of code.
  • Distinguish between the two feed modes
  • Distinguish between the two speed modes.
  • Identify the speed and feed parameters of a drilling sequence.
  • Identify commands that happen before cutting.
  • Describe the codes that perform tool changes.
  • Identify the cutting parameters of a boring operation.
  • Describe the operation of the turning canned cycle.
  • Follow the operation of a canned cycle.
  • Explain the parameters of a drilling canned cycle.
  • Identify the role of the repeating codes throughout a program.
  • Define the purpose of proving out.

Class Vocabulary

Vocabulary TermDefinition
absolute coordinates A series of numerical positions that are calculated from a fixed point of origin.
canned cycle A sequence of machine operations initiated by a single G code. Canned cycles act as shortcuts that simplify the program. Rough turning, finish turning, and peck drilling sequences are common canned cycles.
circular interpolation A translation of linear axis positions into curved tool motions. Circular interpolation requires an endpoint, a feed rate, a center, a radius, and a direction of movement.
computer-aided design The use of computer software to aid in the design of a part and the generation of the part program.
computer-aided manufacturing The use of computer software to aid in the design of manufacturing processes.
constant surface speed A speed mode used on the turning center that adjusts the spindle speed to maintain a constant cutting speed at the tool tip. CSS mode increases spindle speed as the tool approaches the spindle centerline, and decreases spindle speed as it travels away from the centerline.
F code A code that determines the specific feed during a cutting operation.
G code A code that determines the type of operation performed on the machine. G codes select the type of motion, speed or feed mode, etc.
geometry offset An offset used on a turning center to account for the setup and geometry of a specific tool held in the turret. Each tool requires its own geometry offset.
incremental coordinate A series of numerical positions that use the previous position as the point of origin for the next position.
ipm Inches per minute. Feed rates measured in ipm describe how far the tool advances in one minute. It is most commonly used on machining centers.
ipr Inches per revolution. Feed rates measured in ipr describe how far the tool advances in one rotation. It is most commonly used on turning centers.
linear interpolation A translation of linear axis positions into straight vertical, horizontal, or diagonal tool movements. Linear interpolation requires an endpoint and a feed rate.
M code A code used to signal an action from a miscellaneous group of commands. M codes change cutting tools, turn on or turn off the coolant, spindle, or workpiece clamps, etc.
mode A programmed function that stays in effect until it is either cancelled or substituted with another function.
optional stop A code that pauses the program if the appropriate switch is selected on the machine. Optional stops allow the operator to inspect the machine between operations. M01 typically indicates an optional stop.
part program A series of instructions used by a CNC machine to perform the necessary sequence of operations to machine a specific workpiece.
prove out Perform a series of steps to manually verify the accuracy of a part program. Operators use dry runs and single blocking to thoroughly check a program.
rapid positioning The movement of machine components at the fastest possible rate of travel. Rapid positioning merely requires an endpoint for the movement.
rpm Revolutions per minute. Speed is measured in rpm on the turning center for operations requiring a constant spindle speed.
S code A code that determines the speed during a cutting operation.
surface feet per minute A measurement of speed describing the distance that the tool tip travels in one minute. It is used for operations requiring an adjustment of spindle speed as the tool moves toward or away from the centerline. Surface feet per minute is abbreviated as sfm or fpm.
T code A code used to indicate the specific tool for a tool change. Depending on the control, the T code initiates the tool change and/or references the matching geometry offset.
toolpath The series of movements made by the tip of a cutting tool. X and Z codes indicate a toolpath within a part program.
U code A code that indicates an incremental position along the X-axis. U codes are also used in roughing canned cycles to leave a small amount of stock for finishing.
W code A code that indicates an incremental position along the Z-axis. W codes are also used in roughing canned cycles to leave a small amount of stock for finishing.
X code A code that describes a specific position along the X-axis.
Z code A code that describes a specific position along the Z-axis.