What is the definition of "spot drilling"?
The use of a shorter, sturdier drill to locate a hole for drilling. Spot drilling often uses a drill size slightly larger than the hole diameter to leave a chamfer after the hole is drilled.

Learn more about spot drilling in the class Canned Cycles 310 below.


CNC Training


Class Information
CNC Training Tooling U-SME classes are offered at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. The typical class consists of 12 to 25 lessons and will take approximately one hour to complete.
Class Name:Canned Cycles 310
Description:This class describes the operation of common canned cycles that appear on machining and turning centers. Includes an Interactive Lab.
Prerequisites: 200140  300280 
Difficulty:Advanced
Number of Lessons:17
Language:English, Spanish, Chinese
 
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Class Outline
  • Objectives
  • The Purpose of Canned Cycles
  • Types of Canned Cycles
  • Hole-Making Cycles
  • Drilling
  • Drilling with Dwell
  • Peck Drilling
  • Tapping
  • Boring/Reaming
  • Incorporating Hole-Making Cycles
  • Basic Turning Cycles
  • Rough Turning and Facing
  • Rough Profile Turning
  • Finish Turning/Facing
  • Threading
  • Milling Canned Cycles
  • Summary
  
Class Objectives
  • Identify the advantages of canned cycles.
  • Explain the degree of canned cycle standardization.
  • Describe general tool movements for hole-making canned cycles.
  • Demonstrate the operation of a drilling canned cycle.
  • Demonstrate the operation of a drilling canned cycle with a dwell.
  • Demonstrate the operation of peck drilling canned cycles.
  • Demonstrate the operation of tapping canned cycles.
  • Demonstrate the operation of boring/reaming canned cycles.
  • Explain how hole-making canned cycles are commonly used.
  • Demonstrate the operation of basic turning and facing canned cycles.
  • Demonstrate the operation of multiple repetitive turning and facing canned cycles.
  • Demonstrate the operation of a multiple repetitive profile turning canned cycle.
  • Demonstrate how a finishing canned cycle is used with multiple repetitive cycles.
  • Demonstrate the operation of a multiple repetitive threading canned cycle.
  • Identify common types of milling canned cycles.

Class Vocabulary

Vocabulary TermDefinition
canned cycle A sequence of machine operations initiated by a single G code. Canned cycles act as shortcuts that simplify the program.
clearance plane A common term for the distance specified by the R level.
conversational programming A programming method that allows an operator to machine a part by responding to a series of questions and prompts. Conversational programming does not reveal the actual program codes.
counterboring A hole-making operation that enlarges one end of a previously drilled hole to a certain depth. The enlarged end contains a flat interior.
depth of thread The distance between the top and bottom of the thread.
dwell An intentional time delay during which the rotating tool remains in contact with the workpiece. A dwell can be used to improve the finish of a hole.
initial level The imaginary plane parallel to the X- and Y-axes that indicates the tool position as the canned cycle is initiated. The initial level is typically located above the R level.
lead The linear distance that the tool advances with one rotation of the spindle.
left-hand tap A tap that rotates counterclockwise as it enters the hole to cut a thread.
live tooling Power-driven cutting tools such as end mills and drills that are held in the turret of a lathe. Live tools can perform machining operations off the part centerline while the workpiece is held in the spindle.
mode A programmed function that stays in effect until it is either cancelled or substituted with another function.
multiple repetitive cycle A canned cycle for the lathe that uses a single block of code to automatically execute a series of tool passes.
peck drilling A drilling operation that periodically retracts the tool to clear chips or flood the hole with coolant. Peck drilling is often used for holes that are three or four times deeper than the drill diameter.
R level The imaginary plane parallel to the X- and Y-axes indicating the safe distance for rapid tool movement from one operation to the next. A typical R level is 0.1 inches away from the part surface.
right-hand tap A tap that rotates clockwise as it enters the hole to cut a thread.
spot drilling The use of a shorter, sturdier drill to locate a hole for drilling. Spot drilling often uses a drill size slightly larger than the hole diameter to leave a chamfer after the hole is drilled.