What is the definition of "online programming"?
A programming method that requires the robot to remain ON in order to learn. Also known as teach programming.

Learn more about online programming in the class Concepts of Robot Programming 210 below.


Robotics Training


Class Information
Tooling U classes are offered at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. The typical class consists of 12 to 25 lessons and will take approximately one hour to complete.
Class Name:Concepts of Robot Programming 210
Description:This class covers the fundamental concepts required for programming industrial robots.
Prerequisites: none
Difficulty:Intermediate
Number of Lessons:13
Language:English, Spanish

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Below are all the competencies and job programs that contain the class Concepts of Robot Programming 210. Job programs are our traditional class lists organized according to common job functions. Competencies are our latest job-specific curricula that help tie online learning to practical, hands-on tasks.

Click on any title to view its details.

Competencies

Class Outline
  • Objectives
  • Programming for Industrial Robots
  • Walk-Through Programming
  • Lead-Through Programming
  • Pros and Cons of Online Programming
  • Offline Programming
  • Pros and Cons of Offline Programming
  • Robot Axes
  • Kinematics
  • Point to Point Control
  • Continuous Path Control
  • Simulators
  • Summary
  
Class Objectives
  • Describe robot programming.
  • Describe walk-through programming.
  • Describe lead-through programming.
  • List the advantages and disadvantages of online programming.
  • Describe offline programming.
  • List the advantages and disadvantages of offline programming.
  • Describe robot axes.
  • Describe kinematics.
  • Describe point to point path control.
  • Describe continuous path control.
  • Describe robot simulator programs.

Class Vocabulary

Vocabulary TermDefinition
algorithm A mathematical process designed to systematically solve a problem.
AML A Manufacturing Language. A robot programming language developed by IBM.
axes The plural of axis. An axis is an imaginary straight line or circle used to describe the location or movement of an object in the Cartesian coordinate system.
BASIC The Beginners' All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code. An early computer programming language that is sometimes used with robots.
C A general purpose programming language that is used on robots.
CAD/CAM Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing. A computer graphics program that is used to design products.
Cartesian coordinate system A numerical system that describes the location of an object by numerically expressing its distance from a fixed position along three linear axes.
Cartesian coordinates A numerical system that describes the location of an object by numerically expressing its distance from a fixed position along three linear axes.
continuous path control A type of robot programming that has the manipulator move smoothly without stopping along its path.
control system A method of directing the type of path a robot takes.
controller The main device that processes information and carries out instructions in a robot. Also known as the processor.
degrees of freedom The ability to move in a specific direction. Robots can have up to 6 degrees of freedom.
end-effector The end component of a robotic arm that is shaped like a hand or like a specialized tool. Also known as end-of-arm tool (EOAT).
E-stop A switch that brings a robot to safe, rapid stop. Also called an emergency stop.
FORTRAN FORmula TRANslation. A high-level programming language for robots that is also used for scientific, engineering, and mathematical applications.
forward kinematics The calculating of the position or motion of each robotic link as a function of joint displacements.
frame A self-contained group of coordinates that describes both a robot's position and its orientation.
industrial robot A programmable mechanical device that is used in place of a person to perform dangerous or repetitive tasks with a high degree of accuracy.
inverse kinematics The calculating of joint displacements needed to move the end-effector to a desired position and orientation.
joint The location at which two or more parts of a robotic arm make contact. Joints allow parts to move in different directions.
Karel A proprietary robot programming language developed by FANUC Robotics.
kinematics The science of motion without regard for the forces that cause that motion. In robotics, kinematics involves studying the mapping of coordinates in motion.
lead-through programming A programming method in which a robot is placed in "teach mode" while the trainer uses a remote teach pendant to manipulate the robot through the different steps of the job. Also known as teach pendant programming.
offline programming A programming method in which the trainer writes a program and uploads it to the robot.
online programming A programming method that requires the robot to remain ON in order to learn. Also known as teach programming.
orientation The alignment of the robot in relation to its position, i.e., up, down, left, right.
path The route taken by a robot to travel from one location to another.
pick and place The process of picking up an object or part in one location and placing it in another location. Pick and place robots are popular in production lines.
point A precise location in two or three-dimensional space.
point to point control A type of robot programming that has the manipulator reach a set point, stop, complete its task, and then move to the next set point.
position A robot's location in three-dimensional space.
processor The main device that processes information and carries out instructions in a robot. Also known as the controller.
programming arm A tool used by programmers to physically move the robot through different steps of the job process.
proprietary language A programming language that has been developed privately by a manufacturer for its own brand of robots.
ROBOGUIDE A robot simulator program developed by FANUC Robotics.
robot engineer A person whose job is to design robots, develop new applications for robots, and conduct research into robot capabilities. Robot engineers typically have four years of college education and a graduate degree.
robot programming The process of entering information such as velocity and travel time into the robot's processor.
sensor A device that detects the presence or absence of an object, or certain properties of that object, and provides feedback. Sensors allow robots to interact with their environment.
simulator A software application that creates a virtual world in which robots can be tested.
teach pendant A hand-held device that can be used to program a robot and control its movements.
teach pendant programming A programming method in which a robot is placed in "teach mode" while the trainer uses a remote teach pendant to manipulate the robot through the different steps of the job. Also known as lead-through programming.
teach programming A programming method that requires the robot to remain ON in order to learn. Also known as online programming.
tool coordinates A coordinate system that uses the tool at the end of the robot's arm as the point of origin.
VAL A robot programming language developed by Unimate.
walk-through programming A programming method in which the trainer physically moves the robot through different steps of the job process.
world coordinates A coordinate system that uses the robot’s mounting base as a point of origin.
X-axis The linear axis representing side-to-side movement in a robot.
Y-axis The linear axis representing back and forth movement in a robot.
Z-axis The linear axis that represents up and down movement in a robot.