What is the definition of "compression strength"?
A material's ability to resist forces that attempt to compress or squeeze the material together.

Learn more about compression strength in the class Mechanical Properties of Metals 120 below.


Materials Training


Class Information
Tooling U classes are offered at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. The typical class consists of 12 to 25 lessons and will take approximately one hour to complete.
Class Name:Mechanical Properties of Metals 120
Description:This class describes common mechanical properties of metals and explains the stress-strain curve. Includes an Interactive Lab.
Prerequisites: none
Difficulty:Beginner
Number of Lessons:12
Language:English, Spanish, Chinese

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Below are all the competencies and job programs that contain the class Mechanical Properties of Metals 120. Job programs are our traditional class lists organized according to common job functions. Competencies are our latest job-specific curricula that help tie online learning to practical, hands-on tasks.

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Class Outline
  • Objectives
  • The Importance of Material Properties
  • The Origin of Mechanical Properties
  • Stress and Strain
  • The Elastic Region
  • The Plastic Region
  • Types of Strength
  • Ductility
  • Toughness
  • Hardness
  • The Safety Factor
  • Summary
  
Class Objectives
  • Describe mechanical properties.
  • Describe the significance of crystal structure.
  • Distinguish between stress and strain.
  • Define elastic region.
  • Define plastic region.
  • Identify types of strength.
  • Define ductility.
  • Define toughness.
  • Define hardness.
  • Describe the safety factor.

Class Vocabulary

Vocabulary TermDefinition
body-centered cubic The crystal structure that contains an atom in the center and one atom in each corner of a cube. Metals with a body-centered cubic crystal structure tend to be hard.
bond An attraction that forms when electrons are shared or transferred among atoms. Atomic bonds become the "glue" that holds the atoms together.
Brinell test A hardness test that measures the diameter of a circle formed by the penetration of a 10mm steel ball under a fixed load pressure.
Charpy test An impact test that measures the amount of energy a material can absorb. The material is broken by a falling pendulum, and the following upswing of the pendulum is measured.
cold working The shaping of metal at temperatures much lower than the metal's molten state. Steel is often cold worked at room temperature.
compression strength A material's ability to resist forces that attempt to compress or squeeze the material together.
compression stress A force that attempts to flatten or "squeeze" a material.
crystal structure The formation of crystals, which consist of a repeating pattern of atoms. A crystalline structure develops as a liquid metal cools and changes into a solid.
cutting tool A device with sharp edges used to cut metal. Cutting tools are either single point or multi-point.
drawn The attempt to pull a metal through a die in order to stretch it.
ductile Able to be drawn, stretched, or formed without breaking.
ductility A metal's ability to be drawn, stretched, or formed without breaking.
elastic region The region of the stress-strain graph in which deformation is temporary. If a material is forced beyond the elastic region, it experiences plastic deformation.
face-centered cubic The crystal structure that contains one atom in the center of the six sides of a cube and one atom in each corner of the cube. Metals with a face-centered cubic crystal structure tend to be ductile.
grain An individual crystal in a metal or alloy.
hardness A material's ability to resist penetration, indentation, or scratching. Hard materials tend to be very wear resistant.
hexagonal close-packed The crystal structure that contains a collection of atoms that are closely packed into the shape of a hexagon. Metals with a hexagonal close-packed crystal structure tend to be brittle.
impact toughness The amount of energy that a material can absorb from a sudden, sharp blow before it breaks or fractures.
indenter A device used in a hardness test that is pressed into the test material.
load The weight or burden that is supported by a material.
mechanical properties The properties that describe a material's ability to compress, stretch, bend, scratch, dent, or break.
modulus of elasticity A variable that describes the relationship of stress to strain within the elastic region. The modulus of elasticity describes a material's stiffness.
necking The reduction in diameter that occurs as a sample material is subjected to tensile stresses.
plastic deformation Deformation that is permanent. Plastic deformation occurs after excessive elastic deformation.
plastic region An area of the stress-strain graph in which permanent changes to a metal begin to occur.
properties The characteristics of a material that distinguish it from other materials.
Rockwell test A hardness test that measures the degree of penetration into a metal caused by a diamond or other hard material that is applied under a fixed load.
safety factor A number that describes the safe, allowable working stress of a material.
shear strength A material's ability to resist forces that attempt to cause the internal structure of the material to slide against itself.
shear stress A force that attempts to cause the internal structure of a material to slide against itself.
slip band The appearance of fragmented crystals and spaces indicating that a metal is about to break.
stamping die An assembled device with an upper and lower plate that opens and closes and contains special tools for cutting or shaping sheet metal.
steel A metal consisting of iron and carbon, usually with small amounts of manganese, phosphorus, sulfur, and silicon.
strain The ratio of change in a dimension that takes place with a material under stress.
strength A metal's ability to resist outside forces that are trying to break or deform the metal.
stress A force that attempts to deform an object.
stress-strain graph A graph that describes the relationship between stress and strain and marks the elastic and plastic regions for a given material.
tensile strength A material's ability to resist forces that attempt to pull it apart or stretch it.
tensile stress A force that attempts to pull apart or stretch a material.
torsion stress A type of shear stress that attempts to twist a material against itself.
toughness The amount of energy a material can absorb before it breaks.
yield strength The point on the stress-strain curve where there is a sudden increase in strain, but no increase in stress. It is at this point that a metal is about to permanently deform.