Welding Training


Class Information
Tooling U-SME classes are offered at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. The typical class consists of 12 to 25 lessons and will take approximately one hour to complete.
Class Name:Arc Welding Processes 120
Description:This class describes the various arc welding processes as well as the particular advantages and disadvantages of each process. Includes an Interactive Lab.
Prerequisites: 650115 
Difficulty:Beginner
Number of Lessons:16
Language:English, Spanish, Chinese
 
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Class Outline
  • Objectives
  • What Is Arc Welding?
  • Types of Arc Welding Processes
  • Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)
  • Pros and Cons of SMAW
  • Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)
  • Metal Transfer
  • Pros and Cons of GMAW
  • Flux-Cored Arc Welding (FCAW)
  • Pros and Cons of Self-Shielded FCAW
  • Pros and Cons of Gas-Shielded FCAW
  • Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)
  • Pros and Cons of GTAW
  • Other Arc Welding Processes
  • Plasma Arc Welding (PAW)
  • Summary
  
Class Objectives
  • Define arc welding.
  • List the most common types of arc welding processes.
  • Describe shielded metal arc welding.
  • Describe the advantages of SMAW.
  • Describe gas metal arc welding.
  • Identify the different types of metal transfer.
  • Describe the advantages of GMAW.
  • Describe flux-cored arc welding.
  • Describe the advantages of self-shielded FCAW.
  • Describe the advantages of gas-shielded FCAW.
  • Describe gas tungsten arc welding.
  • Describe the advantages of GTAW.
  • Identify specialized types of arc welding processes.
  • Describe plasma arc welding.

Class Vocabulary

Vocabulary TermDefinition
aluminum A nonferrous, silvery-white metal that is soft and light. Aluminum is one of the most difficult metals to weld.
American Welding Society The non-profit society that regulates the industrial standards for welding.
arc welding A fusion welding process that uses electricity to generate the heat needed to melt the base metals.
argon A colorless, odorless type of inert gas. Argon is commonly used as shielding gas.
carbon dioxide A heavy, colorless, odorless gas. Carbon dioxide is a commonly used shielding gas.
carbon steel A common metal that is an alloy of iron and carbon. Carbon steels are the most commonly welded metals.
cast iron A metal consisting of iron, over 2.11% carbon, and 1 to 3% silicon. Cast irons will normally contain trace amounts of other elements.
conductor A material that allows for the flow of electricity. For a successful arc weld, electrodes and base metals must be good conductors.
consumable electrode An electrode that conducts electricity to the arc but also melts into the weld as a filler metal.
current The flow of electricity, measured in amperes or amps. Arc welding requires a continous flow of electricity to maintain the arc.
deoxidizer A substance used to remove oxygen from a material. Flux contains deoxidizers.
electric arc The area in which electricity jumps from the electrode to the workpiece. The heat generated by the arc melts the base metals.
electrode A device that conducts electricity. In welding, the electrode also can act as the filler metal.
electrogas welding A type of arc welding process that uses a continuous consumable electrode, which deposits molten metal into molding shoes. This type of arc welding is generally used for vertical position welding.
filler metal A type of metal sometimes added to the joint in fusion welding. Filler metal adds to the strength and mass of the welded joint.
flux A non-metallic material used to protect the weld puddle and solid metal from atmospheric contamination.
flux-cored arc welding An arc welding process that uses a continuously fed consumable electrode that contains flux in a hollowed-out center. It is also referred to as FCAW.
frequency The rate at which an electrical current alternates, expressed as the number of cycles per unit of time. Frequency is typically measured in Hertz (Hz) or cycles per second.
fusion welding A welding process that melts the base metals at the joint. Upon cooling, the welded joint is often stronger than the base metals.
gas metal arc welding An arc welding process in which the bare wire electrode and inert shielding gas are fed to the weld through a welding gun. It is also referred to as GMAW or MIG welding.
gas tungsten arc welding A very precise arc welding process that uses a nonconsumable tungsten electrode. It is also referred to as GTAW or TIG welding.
gas-shielded flux-cored arc welding A type of FCAW process that uses a tubular wire electrode filled with flux and an external shielding gas. Gas-shielded FCAW provides double shielding protection.
globular transfer A type of metal transfer that occurs when the wire electrode touches the workpiece and produces a large ball of metal, which deposits large amounts of metal into the weld puddle.
granular flux A type of flux that consists of numerous small particles. In SAW, this layer of granular flux covers the weld and prevents spark and spatter.
helium A light, colorless, nonflammable type of inert gas. Helium is commonly used as shielding gas.
inert Very slow or nonreactive. Inert gases are used for shielding.
joint The meeting point of the two materials that are joined together. Welding creates a permanent joint.
low-alloy steel A type of steel that contains a mixture of elements besides carbon.
MIG welding Another name for gas metal arc welding or GMAW.
molding shoes Containers that are pressed against each side of the gap between the base metals to be welded. Molding shoes collect the molten weld metal.
plasma A type of gas that becomes electrically conductive when heated to approximately 54,000°F (30,000°C).
plasma arc welding An arc welding process that uses a nonconsumable tungsten electrode, which emits a plasma gas toward the arc and an external shielding gas. Plasma arc welding is commonly used for deep, narrow welds.
self-shielded flux-cored arc welding A type of FCAW process that uses only a tubular wire electrode filled with flux.
shielded metal arc welding An arc welding process that uses a flux-coated rod. It is also referred to in the shop as SMAW or stick welding.
shielding A gas or type of flux that provides protection to the weld area.
shielding gas A layer of inert gas that protects the weld puddle and arc from atmospheric contamination.
short circuit An interruption in the intended flow of electricity, especially when current flows "short" of reaching a device. A short circuit causes excess current flow.
short circuit transfer A type of metal transfer that occurs when the wire electrode touches the workpiece and produces a short circuit and high current. The high current level causes a violent transfer of metal, which creates the weld.
slag Cooled flux that forms on top of the bead. Slag protects cooling metal and is then chipped off.
spark plug A part that fits into an internal combustion engine and carries two electrodes separated by an air gap across which the current from the ignition system discharges to form the spark for combustion.
spatter Liquid metal droplets expelled from the welding process. Spatter can leave undesirable dots of metal on a workpiece surface.
spray transfer A type of metal transfer that occurs when the metal at the end of the wire electrode melts into small, fine droplets creating a stable arc and little spatter.
stainless steel A steel that resists tarnishing. Stainless steel can be welded using many methods.
stick welding Another name for shielded metal arc welding, or SMAW.
submerged arc welding An arc welding process that uses a consumable wire electrode, which deposits a layer of flux over the weld to prevent spatter. It is also referred to as SAW.
TIG welding Another name for gas tungsten arc welding or GTAW.
tungsten A gray metal that is very strong at elevated temperatures. Tungsten is used to make nonconsumable electrodes.
weld bead The end product of a joint that has been welded.
weld puddle The small area of molten metal that forms during welding. The cooled weld puddle forms the permanent joint. A weld puddle is also called a weld pool, molten pool, or molten puddle.
welder Either the person who performs a weld or the power source that provides the electricity needed to perform an arc weld. Printed materials may use both meanings of the term.
welding A joining process that uses heat, pressure, and/or chemicals to fuse two materials together permanently.