Fasteners Training


Class Information
Fasteners Training Tooling U-SME classes are offered at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. The typical class consists of 12 to 25 lessons and will take approximately one hour to complete.
Class Name:Intro to Assembly 100
Description:This class describes the common assembly methods of mechanical fastening, adhesive bonding, and welding.
Prerequisites: none
Difficulty:Beginner
Number of Lessons:14
Language:English, Spanish
 
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Class Outline
  • Objectives
  • What Is Assembly?
  • Methods of Assembly
  • What Is Mechanical Fastening?
  • Pros and Cons of Mechanical Fastening
  • What Is Adhesive Bonding?
  • Pros and Cons of Adhesive Bonding
  • What Is Welding?
  • Pros and Cons of Welding
  • What Is an Assembly Line?
  • Manual Assembly Lines
  • Automated Assembly Lines
  • Tools for Mechanical Assembly
  • Summary
  
Class Objectives
  • Define assembly.
  • List common methods of assembly.
  • Define mechanical fastening.
  • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical fastening.
  • Define adhesive bonding.
  • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of adhesive bonding.
  • Define welding.
  • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of welding.
  • Define assembly line.
  • Describe how a manual assembly line works.
  • Describe how an automated assembly line works.
  • List common tools used in assembly.

Class Vocabulary

Vocabulary TermDefinition
adherent The term used to describe an object that is joined to another object with an adhesive.
adhesive A nonmetallic material used to join two or more materials together.
adhesive bonding The joining of two or more materials through the use of a nonmetallic material such as liquids, drops, or gels.
assembler The person who assembles parts.
assembly The process in which two or more objects are joined together.
assembly line A production process in which products are mass-produced in stages.
assembly site The place where assembly is performed.
automated assembly line A type of assembly line in which the majority of the tasks are performed by automated machines.
automation The automatic control of equipment, a process, or a system. Automation is an efficient means of assembly.
base metal The metals to be joined by welding or other fastening methods.
bolt A cylindrically shaped, threaded device used for fastening parts. Bolts usually have blunt ends and mate with a nut.
brazing A process in which a filler metal is melted at a temperature above 840°, but below the melting point of the base metals to form a joint between two base metals. Brazing differs from welding because only the filler metal is melted.
brittle A material's unwillingness to be drawn, stretched, or formed. Brittle materials are likely to break or fracture if they are stretched.
clamp A device used to hold a tool or workpiece in place against locators.
compressor tool A tool that uses pressure to perform a task. Common tools that use compressors are nail guns and staple guns.
corrosion The gradual chemical attack on a material by atmosphere, moisture, or other agents.
curing The process in which an adhesive undergoes a chemical reaction and becomes a solid. Curing may require pressure, heat, or a specific amount of time.
drill A tool that drives screws and creates holes. Drills do not contain a clutch and therefore do not control torque.
ergonomics The study of designing devices to decrease operator discomfort or fatigue and increase productivity.
fabricator Another term used to describe an assembler.
fastener A device that holds two or more objects together. A fastener is a bolt or a screw, or even a button or a zipper.
filler metal Metal added independently of the base metals to a welding process to add strength to the welded joint.
inventory The storage of raw material, in-process parts, and completed, manufactured products. Excess inventory is considered waste.
jig A device used to hold a tool in place.
joint The point at which two materials are joined together.
manual assembly line A type of assembly line in which the majority of the tasks are performed by assemblers.
mechanical fastening The joining of two or more materials through the use of fasteners such as nails, bolts, or screws.
nail A thin, pointed type of fastener that is fastened into an object with a hammer. Nails are typically used with nonmetallic materials.
nail gun A tool that uses pressure to automatically force a nail into an object.
nut A component, usually made of metal, with a threaded hole that mates with a bolt. The outer shape of a nut is often six-sided.
properties A characteristic of a material that distinguishes it from other materials.
screw A threaded device used for fastening parts or transferring motion.
screwdriver A tool used to tighten screws.
soldering A process in which a filler metal is melted at temperatures below 840° to form a joint between two base metals. Soldering is often used for delicate projects such as jewelry and electronics.
staple gun A tool that uses pressure to automatically force a staple into an object.
strip A condition in which a screw has damaged threads as a result of too much torque or force applied to it. A stripped screw is ineffective.
structural adhesive A type of heavy-duty adhesive used for large-scale projects.
torque The amount of force applied to tighten a screw.
weld defects Any one of the various defects that can cause a weld to fail. Weld defects include porosity, incomplete fusion, weld cracking, and undercut.
weld metal The molten metal, that upon solidification, becomes the welded joint.
welding A joining process that uses heat, pressure, and/or chemicals to fuse two materials together permanently.
workholding A device used to support, locate, and hold a workpiece. The workholder references the tool performing the operation on the part being held.
wrench A tool used to hold or twist nuts and bolts.