What is the definition of "Class II liquid"?
A combustible liquid with a flash point between 100°F (37.8°C) and below 140°F (60°C). Examples of Class II liquids include acetic acid and kerosene.

Learn more about Class II liquid in the class Flammable/Combustible Liquids 155 below.


Safety Training


Class Information
Tooling U classes are offered at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. The typical class consists of 12 to 25 lessons and will take approximately one hour to complete.
Class Name:Flammable/Combustible Liquids 155
Description:This class describes the hazards associated with flammable and combustible liquids and explains proper methods for safe storage, handling, and transferring of these liquids.
Prerequisites: none
Difficulty:Beginner
Number of Lessons:16
Language:English, Spanish

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Below are all the competencies and job programs that contain the class Flammable/Combustible Liquids 155. Job programs are our traditional class lists organized according to common job functions. Competencies are our latest job-specific curricula that help tie online learning to practical, hands-on tasks.

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Competencies


Class Outline
  • Objectives
  • The Dangers of Flammable and Combustible Liquids
  • What Are Flammable and Combustible Liquids?
  • Classes of Flammable and Combustible Liquids
  • Information Sources for Hazardous Liquids
  • Creating a Plan for Using Flammable Liquids
  • Preventing Static Electricity
  • Storage Fundamentals
  • Safety Cans
  • Storage Cabinets
  • Storage Rooms
  • Fire Prevention
  • Fire Control
  • Transferring Flammable Liquids
  • Waste and Residue
  • Summary
  
Class Objectives
  • Describe OSHA flammable liquid safety regulations for employers.
  • Define flash point.
  • Distinguish between a flammable liquid and a combustible liquid.
  • Distinguish between classes of flammable and combustible liquids.
  • Describe information sources for flammable liquids.
  • Describe the components of a flammable liquids safety plan.
  • Describe how to prevent ignition from static electricity.
  • Describe OSHA guidelines for storing flammable liquids.
  • Describe OSHA approved safety cans.
  • Describe OSHA approved storage cabinets.
  • Describe OSHA approved storage rooms.
  • Identify the factors that produce a fire.
  • Explain strategies for fire control in the workplace.
  • Identify OSHA approved methods for transferring flammable liquids.
  • Identify OSHA approved methods for disposing of waste and residue.

Class Vocabulary

Vocabulary TermDefinition
boiling point The temperature at which a liquid changes to a vapor.
bond wire A wire that connects two objects to reduce the build up of electrical charges between them. Bond wires are used to connect containers when transferring flammable and combustible liquids from one container to another to reduce the formation of harmful static electricity.
bonding Physically connecting two electrically conductive objects together to eliminate a difference in the static charge potential between them. Bonding often occurs between metal containers and is done using a bond wire.
Class IA liquid A flammable liquid with a flash point less than 73°F (22.8°C) and a boiling point less than 100°F (37.8°C). Examples of Class IA liquids include acetaldehyde and ethylamine, which are used in chemical processes.
Class IB liquid A flammable liquid with a flash point of less than 73°F (22.8°C) and a boiling point over 100°F (37.8°C). Examples of Class IA liquids include benzene and gasoline.
Class IC liquid A flammable liquid with a flash point between 73°F (22.8°C) below 100°F (37.8°C). An example of a Class IC liquid is hydrazine propyl alcohol.
Class II liquid A combustible liquid with a flash point between 100°F (37.8°C) and below 140°F (60°C). Examples of Class II liquids include acetic acid and kerosene.
Class IIIA liquid A combustible liquid with a flash point between 140°F (60°C) and 200°F (93.4°C). Examples of Class IIIA liquids include butyric acid and phenol.
Class IIIB liquid A combustible liquid with a flash point at or above 200°F (93.4°C). OSHA flammable and combustible liquid regulations do not apply to Class IIIB.
closed piping system A piping system used to transport liquids that is sealed to prevent vapors. Closed piping systems help prevent fires due to flammable or combustible liquids.
combustible liquid A liquid that will ignite if it reaches its flash point and is provided with an ignition source. Combustible liquids have a flash point above 100° Fahrenheit (37.8°C).
drum A large metal storage container used for storing substances such as flammable and combustible liquids. OSHA-approved drums for flammable liquid storage must be equipped with safety features such as safety vents.
drum bung opening The opening of a storage drum located on the top of the container. Flammable and combustible liquids are transferred from drums to smaller containers via the drum bung opening.
fire flashback The explosion of a container caused by a fire that occurs outside the container and then enters the container through the flammable or combustible liquid's vapors.
flame arrester screen A mechanical device installed on a storage tank or portable container nozzle designed to prevent the build up of flammable vapors and quickly extinguish a fire in the container by rapidly dissipating heat from the fire. It is made of double mesh wire and extends inside the container from the nozzle.
flammable liquid A liquid that will ignite if it reaches its flash point and is provided with an ignition source. Flammable liquids have a flash point below 100° Fahrenheit (37.8°C) and can typically ignite at room temperature.
flash point The lowest temperature at which a liquid produces enough vapor to form an ignitable mixture. Liquids with low flash points pose the greatest danger.
ground wire A wire that connects an object to a copper rod drilled into the earth that helps prevent the build up of electric charges. Ground wires are attached to the metal drums used to store flammable liquids to prevent static electricity.
grounding Physically connecting a conductive object with a rod driven into the earth using a wire. Grounding provides a conductive path for electrical charges and carries them away from objects to prevent the build up of static electricity.
hazard communication The means through which employers inform their employees about hazards in the workplace, including training and MSDS.
ignition source Any process or event capable of causing a fire or explosion. Open flames, sparks, static electricity, and hot surfaces are all possible ignition sources.
incipient stage fire A fire in its beginning stage. Incipient stage fires can be controlled with portable fire extinguishers and small hose systems.
Material Safety Data Sheet Mandatory information that must accompany almost every chemical in the workplace, including flammable and combustible liquids. An MSDS includes details such as the risks, precautions, and first aid procedures associated with the chemical.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration A government agency that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States and ensures that employees work in safe and healthy environments. The Occupational Safety & Health Administration is abbreviated as OSHA.
oily waste can A container used for disposing rags soaked in flammable and combustible liquids. The oily waste can features a self-closing lid.
safety can A portable container used for storing one to five gallons of flammable or combustible liquids. The OSHA-approved safety can must include safety features such as a safety vent.
safety disposal can A container used for storing and disposing up to five gallons of industrial waste, including flammable and combustible liquids.
safety pump An OSHA-approved device used for transferring liquids from storage drums to portable containers that is faster and safer than the self-closing faucet. The safety pump attaches directly to the drum's opening.
safety vent A vent or opening that prevents the contents in a container from reaching temperatures that would cause them to explode. Most types of OSHA-approved containers for flammable and combustible liquids contain a safety vent.
self-closing safety faucet An OSHA-approved device used for transferring liquids from storage drums to portable containers. The faucet must be used with a bond wire between the storage drum and the nozzle of the portable container.
spring-closing lid A lid using spring action to close automatically after use to limit the amount of oxygen and fuel risk when storing flammable and combustible liquids. The spring-closing lid is an important safety feature found on OSHA-approved safety cans and some other storage containers for flammable and combustible liquids.
static electricity An electrical charge that builds up due to rubbing contact between two dissimilar materials. Static electricity is an ignition source for flammable liquids.
storage cabinet An enclosed container with shelving used to store various industrial materials. An OSHA-approved storage cabinet for flammable and combustible liquids must be made of metal or wood, must include certain safety features, and must be raised two inches (5.08 cm.) from the ground and be properly labeled.
storage room A room used for storing various materials used in production. OSHA requires storage rooms to have an approved ventilation system for storing large amounts of flammable and combustible liquids.
three-point lock A locking mechanism installed on storage cabinet doors that secures doors at the top, bottom, and sides. The three-point lock is required by OSHA to secure cabinets containing flammable and combustible liquids.
vapor The gaseous form of a substance that is a liquid or solid at normal temperatures. The vapors of flammable and combustible liquids can ignite if fire or sparks are present.
waste drum A container used for storing and disposing of large amounts of flammable and combustible liquid waste.