Safety Training


Class Information
Tooling U-SME classes are offered at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. The typical class consists of 12 to 25 lessons and will take approximately one hour to complete.
Class Name:Metalworking Fluid Safety 165
Description:This class explains the health and safety risks inherent to working with metalworking fluids and also describes safe practices that help to reduce metalworking fluid exposure.
Prerequisites: none
Difficulty:Beginner
Number of Lessons:19
Language:English, Spanish
 
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Class Outline
  • Objectives
  • Intro to Metalworking Fluid Safety
  • MWF Information Resources
  • Straight Oil and Soluble Oil MWFs
  • Semi-Synthetic and Synthetic MWFs
  • Harmful Substances in MWFs
  • Inhalation and Ingestion
  • Skin Contact and Eye Contact
  • Factors That Increase Exposure
  • MWF Health Effects: Skin Disorders
  • MWF Health Effects: Long Term
  • Engineering Controls
  • Ventilation Systems
  • Worksite Organization
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Sanitation and Hygiene
  • Fluid Maintenance
  • Fluid Management Occupational Safety and Health Program
  • Summary
  
Class Objectives
  • Explain the purpose of MWFs.
  • Describe the sources of information available for MWF safety.
  • Describe oil-based fluids.
  • Describe synthetic-based fluids.
  • Identify harmful substances in MWFs.
  • Describe inhalation and ingestion.
  • Describe skin contact and eye contact.
  • Identify factors that increase MWF exposure.
  • Describe skin disorders caused by MWF skin contact.
  • Describe long term effects of MWF inhalation.
  • Identify engineering controls used to reduce MWF exposure.
  • Describe ventilation systems used to reduce MWF exposure.
  • Describe worksite practices that affect MWF safety.
  • Identify personal protective equipment necessary for MWF safety.
  • Describe hygiene practices that affect MWF safety.
  • Identify fluid maintenance practices that are necessary for MWF safety.
  • Identify the steps of a fluid management occupational safety and health program.

Class Vocabulary

Vocabulary TermDefinition
acne A skin condition that causes pimples or pustules. MWF skin contact can often lead to acne.
aerosol A gaseous suspension of fine solid or liquid particles. Employees are often exposed to MWFs through aerosol devices that spray MWFs.
allergic contact dermatitis A form of dermatitis that appears over time as a result of prolonged exposure.
animal oil A natural oil derived from the fat of animals. Straight oil often contains animal oil or marine oil to increase lubricity.
asthma A chronic lung disease characterized by fits of obstructed breathing or coughing. Studies have shown that long-term exposure to MWFs can lead to or worsen the effects of asthma.
bacteria Microorganisms that may be harmful to inhale. Bacteria growth in MWFs is a sign of contamination and must be controlled.
barrier cream Cream that is rubbed on the skin to provide a barrier and help reduce the effects of skin contact with a harmful substance. While barrier creams can be effective, they must not be used as a substitute if an application requires gloves.
biocide A substance added to MWFs that is used to curb the growth of microorganisms.
biocide-resistant microorganism A type of microorganism present in MWFs that cannot be killed with biocide alone because it has built up a resistance to it.
cancer Any type of the various malignant cells that surround and invade nearby tissue. Carcinogens in MWFs have been greatly reduced.
carcinogen A cancer-causing substance.
chemical protective clothing Specialized clothing such as aprons, pants, or sleeves designed to provide a protective barrier between the skin and harmful chemicals.
chronic bronchitis An inflammation of the bronchial mucous membrane characterized by coughing and increased mucous production over a long period of time. Studies have shown that long-term exposure to MWFs can lead to or worsen the effects of asthma.
CNC machine A sophisticated machine tool run by a computer that can perform multiple machining operations in the same setup with a variety of tools. Most CNC machines are completely enclosed to minimize MWF exposure.
cold forming The shaping of metal at room temperature.
concentrate A substance that has a reduced volume by the removal of liquid. Many coolants are delivered as a concentrate of the coolant/lubricant substance and require the machinist to add water.
contaminant Any substance that is harmful and poses a safety risk. MWFs require special safety precautions to eliminate and/or reduce exposure to contaminants.
coolant A substance that reduces high temperatures. Metalworking processes yield high temperatures and subsequently require coolants to prevent burning or smoking.
crude oil A type of petroleum oil that is unrefined. Crude oil contains carcinogens.
dedicated exhaust system A type of exhaust system that uses a suction force to capture the contaminated air at the source of contamination. Dedicated exhaust systems either remove contamination from the airstream or re-circulate clean air.
dermatitis A skin condition that causes a red itchy rash. MWF skin contact can often lead to dermatitis.
detergent A substance with chemical components that acts as a cleaning agent.
emulsifiable oil A class of metalworking fluid that is composed of lubricant base oil, emulsifiers, and other additives. Also called soluble oil, emulsifiable oil is obtained as a concentrate and is then mixed with water.
emulsifier A substance that is added to oil to help the oil mix with water.
engineering control A step taken by an administrator to reduce hazards and safety risks before they can reach the employees. Choosing quality chemicals, installing exhaust systems, and maintaining machines and coolant are examples of engineering controls.
exhaust system The collection of various devices used to remove harmful fumes at the source of contamination.
eye contact To be absorbed or contacted by the eye. MWFs may come into eye contact if you are not wearing adequate eye protection, and they are absorbed by tears.
eye protection Any type of eyewear with face shields that protect the eyes in a work area. Goggles and safety glasses are examples of approved protective eyewear.
face shield A rigid, transparent plastic sheet that covers the worker's entire face to protect against dust or splashes. Because face shields do not protect against impacts, they are often worn with goggles.
facemask A breathing device worn to prevent the inhalation of fumes or dust.
flammable A material that can easily ignite and start a fire.
fluid management occupational safety and health program A NIOSH-recommended program followed by employers to ensure the safety of personnel exposed to MWFs. The fluid management occupation safety and health program includes safety and health training, worksite analysis, hazard prevention and control, and medical monitoring of exposed workers.
fungi Any of numerous types of growing organisms that range from single-cell to larger and include yeasts, molds, and mushrooms. Fungi growth in MWFs is harmful if inhaled and must be controlled.
goggles A type of tight-fitting eye protection that completely covers the eyes, the sockets, and the surrounding facial area. Goggles offer protection from impact, dust, chips, and splashes.
Hazard Communication Standard An established OSHA policy that sets guidelines for hazard communication. The HCS emphasizes labeling, MSDS, and training.
hydrogen sulfide A colorless, flammable poisonous gas that has a characteristic rotten-egg odor. Many microorganisms give off hydrogen sulfide, their presence is often detected by their smell.
hypersensitivity pneumonitis An inflammation of the lung caused by bacterial or fungal exposure. HP can cause cold and flu-like symptoms. Studies have shown that exposure to MWFs can lead to or worsen the effects of HP.
ingestion To take into the body by means of swallowing or absorption. It is possible to ingest MWFs if you eat in an area where MWF misting is present.
inhalation Breathing in a substance. The two main types of MWF exposure occur through inhalation and skin contact.
irritant contact dermatitis A form of dermatitis that appears only in the area of contact.
local exhaust system A type of exhaust system that ventilates a specific area of production and may replace the total air volume several times an hour.
lubricant A substance that reduces friction. Metalworking fluids are used to lubricate the metalworking process.
lung disease A chronic disease of the lungs such as emphysema or asthma that makes breathing difficult. Studies have shown that long-term exposure to MWFs can lead to or worsen the effects of lung disease.
marine oil A natural oil derived from the fat of marine animals. Straight oil often contains marine oil or animal oil to increase lubricity.
metal cutting A metalworking process that uses a tool to create chips and remove metal from a workpiece.
metalworking A material manufacturing process that produces parts by mechanically deforming or shaping metal into parts. Metal cutting and molding are two examples of metalworking processes.
metalworking fluid A fluid used to decrease friction and reduce the temperature of the metalworking process. Metalworking fluids are abbreviated as MWFs.
microorganism A tiny, microscopic organism. Many microorganisms emit harmful fumes and their presence can be detected by a rancid smell.
mineral oil Any one of the various light hydrocarbon oils that are derived from natural petroleum. Mineral oils may be used in straight oil combinations to lubricate a metalworking process.
mist A suspension of liquid droplets in the air. Employees are often exposed to MWFs through devices that mist MWFs.
moisturizing cream Hydrating cream that is rubbed on the skin to reduce the effects of skin contact with a harmful substance. While moisturizing creams can be effective, they must not be used as a substitute if an application requires gloves.
mold Any type of the various fungi that cause the disintegration of organic matter. Molds are often present on the surface of MWFs.
molding A metalworking process in which heated liquid metal is poured into a mold to form a shape and then released once it cools and solidifies.
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health The federal agency that is responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for the prevention of work-related injury and illness. NIOSH is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration The United States government agency that regulates the conditions in working environments to ensure the health and safety of employees. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is abbreviated as OSHA.
permissible exposure limits The amount of time, based on a time-weighted average for an eight-hour shift, that someone can be exposed to a harmful substance.
personal protective equipment Any example of various safety equipment that workers wear or use to prevent injury in the workplace. Safety glasses are common personal protective equipment (PPE).
petroleum oil A thick mixture of gaseous, liquid, and solid hydrocarbons that occurs naturally beneath the earth's surface. Refined petroleum oil can be used in the metalworking process as a lubricant.
respirator A breathing device worn to prevent inhalation of hazardous substances.
respiratory disease Any of various diseases that affect the human respiratory system including chronic bronchitis and lung cancer. Long-term inhalation of MWFs has shown to cause respiratory disease.
safety data sheet Mandatory information that must accompany almost every chemical in the workplace except for items like cleaning supplies. An SDS includes details such as the risks, precautions, and first aid procedures associated with the chemical.
SDS Safety data sheets. Mandatory information that must accompany almost every chemical in the workplace except for items like cleaning supplies. An SDS includes details such as the risks, precautions, and first aid procedures associated with the chemical.
semi-synthetic fluid A class of metalworking fluid that is composed of lubricant-based oil and water. Semi-synthetic oil is mixed with a range from 10 to 40 parts water.
short-term exposure limit The amount of time, based on a time-weighted average for a short shift, that someone can be exposed to a harmful substance.
skin contact Touching a substance without any other barrier protection. The two main types of MWF exposure occur through inhalation and skin contact.
soluble oil A class of metalworking fluid that is composed of lubricant based oil, emulsifiers, and other additives. Soluble oil is obtained as a concentrate and is then mixed with water.
straight oil A class of metalworking fluid that is composed of mineral oil or vegetable oil and is mainly used as a lubricant. Straight oil is not intended to be mixed with water.
sump A low-lying resevoir in a machining center where MWF is stored. Regulating the MWF in the sump is crucial to MWF safety.
sump level The ratio of liquid to concentrate in the sump. Sump level must be monitored because a low level of water yields increased exposure to harmful substances in MWFs.
sump life The amount of time an MWF maintains its water-to-concentrate characteristics. It is important to maintain sump life to reduce harmful MWF exposure.
swarf Metal filings or chips extruded during certain metalworking processes. Swarf must be skimmed off of coolant before it may be used safely.
synthetic fluid A class of metalworking fluid that does not contain petroleum oil. Synthetic fluids contain detergent-like components.
time-weighted average A measure of noise exposure that is an average of varying levels of noise experienced in a given eight-hour workday.
tool life The length of time that a cutting tool can function properly before it begins to fail.
tramp oil Oil present in a MWF mix that is not from the intended coolant mixture. Tramp oil is usually a result of machine tool lubrication systems and leaks.
ulceration A raised lesion on the skin. Workers are more suceptible to MWF exposure if they have ulcerations on the skin.
vegetable oil Any one of the various oils obtained from plants. Vegetable oils may be used in straight oil combinations to lubricate a metalworking process.
ventilation A means of providing fresh air. For the safety of the shop floor personnel, the use of MWFs requires proper ventilation.
ventilation system A means of cleaning or re-circulating contaminated air. Ventilation systems are necessary at certain MWF worksites to prevent MWF inhalation.
viscosity The resistance of fluid to flow. A change in MWF viscosity may indicate the fluid is no longer safe to use.
workpiece-tool interface The point of contact between the workpiece and the tool used to machine it. Failure at the workpiece-tool interface may indicate that a fluid is no longer safe to use.