What is the definition of "engineering control"?
A modification made to machinery or processes to prevent the release of hazards into the atmosphere. Switching to a non-hazardous chemical or enclosing a process to prevent the release of fumes are examples of engineering controls.

Learn more about engineering control in the class Respiratory Safety 195 below.


Safety Training


Class Information
Safety Training Tooling U-SME classes are offered at the beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. The typical class consists of 12 to 25 lessons and will take approximately one hour to complete.
Class Name:Respiratory Safety 195
Description:This class covers the most common types of respirators and includes information about fit testing, medical evaluation, and training for employees.
Prerequisites: none
Difficulty:Beginner
Number of Lessons:18
Language:English, Spanish
 
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Class Outline
  • Objectives
  • Hazardous Breathing Environments
  • Respiratory Protection Program
  • Environment and Exposure Assessment
  • Respirator Selection Criteria
  • Air-Purifying Respirators
  • Atmosphere-Supplying Respirators
  • Medical Evaluation
  • Respirator Fitting
  • General Fit Testing
  • Qualitative Fit Testing
  • Quantitative Fit Test
  • Use of Respirators
  • Maintenance and Care of Respirators
  • Maintaining Air-Purifying Respirators
  • Training
  • Engineering Controls
  • Summary
  
Class Objectives
  • Describe proper protection in hazardous breathing environments.
  • Describe the requirements of a respiratory protection program.
  • Describe methods of exposure assessment.
  • Identify respirator selection criteria.
  • Match types of air-purifying respirators with their descriptions.
  • Match types of atmosphere-supplying respirators with their descriptions.
  • Describe OSHA’s medical evaluation requirements.
  • Describe how respirators seal on the wearer’s face.
  • Define general fit testing.
  • Define qualitative fit testing.
  • Define quantitative fit testing.
  • Describe methods of assuring proper fit and function of respirators.
  • Describe respirator maintenance procedures.
  • Describe methods of maintaining air-purifying respirators.
  • Describe OSHA’s respirator training requirements.
  • Identify possible engineering controls for hazardous environments.

Class Vocabulary

Vocabulary TermDefinition
air pressure The weight or force of the air. Respirators may have positive or negative air pressure, making the air they hold heavier or lighter than the ambient air.
airline respirator A breathing device that consists of a full face mask with a long hose that connects to a freestanding tank of compressed air. This device is also called an air-supplied respirator.
air-purifying combination respirator A type of air-purifying respirator that consists of a face mask that covers the eyes, nose, and mouth and has filters that capture particles as well as gases or vapors.
air-purifying respirator A respirator with an air-purifying filter, cartridge, or canister that removes specific air contaminants by passing ambient air through the air-purifying element.
air-supplied respirator A breathing device that consists of a full face mask with a long hose that connects to a freestanding tank of compressed air. Also called airline respirators, these devices are used when employees must spend long periods in low-oxygen atmospheres that are not considered immediately dangerous to life and health.
air-supplying combination respirator A respirator consisting of a full face mask attached by a hose to a freestanding tank, plus a small, wearable air tank in case the main supply fails or the hose becomes damaged.
ambient aerosol condensation nuclei counter A quantitative fit test that measures the number of tiny solid or liquid particles in the atmosphere.
ambient air The air that is common to a particular environment.
asbestos A fibrous material that can cause diseases, such as cancer, if inhaled.
asthma A lung disease characterized by wheezing and difficulty breathing.
atmosphere-supplying respirator A breathing device that supplies the wearer with air from a source that is separate from the ambient air, such as from an air tank.
breathing protection A form of personal protective equipment that protects the wearer from hazards present in the air. Respirators are a common type of breathing protection.
canister A container that holds a filter, absorbent material, chemical substance, or combination of these items that removes specific contaminants from the air as it passes through the container. Canisters are also known as cartridges.
cartridge A container that holds a filter, absorbent material, chemical substance, or combination of these items that removes specific contaminants from the air as it passes through the container. Cartridges are also known as canisters.
chamber An enclosed space. In fit testing, a chamber may be a room or a temporary enclosure made of plastic.
change schedule A method of tracking the service life of respirator components.
compressed air Air that has been squeezed into a small space, such as a tank.
controlled negative pressure A quantitative fit test that starts with negative air pressure and uses a constant, equal amount of air flow in and out of the mask. A CNP test measures leakage into the mask.
denatonium benzoate The most bitter-tasting substance known to humans. Denatonium benzoate is used in qualitative fit testing.
end of service life The point at which the respirator is no longer providing adequate protection. ESL occurs when the air-purifying element, such as a cartridge, has become saturated with contaminants.
end-of-service-life indicator A visible or audible means of warning when a cartridge or other air-purifying element is no longer able to protect the respirator wearer. ESLIs may be active, such as a buzzer, or passive, such as a label that changes color.
engineering control A modification made to machinery or processes to prevent the release of hazards into the atmosphere. Switching to a non-hazardous chemical or enclosing a process to prevent the release of fumes are examples of engineering controls.
exhalation valve A component of a respirator that allows the wearer to push air out of the mask without letting any ambient air back in.
exposure Contact with hazardous materials through inhalation or touching of the skin or mucous membranes.
exposure limit The maximum amount or concentration of a hazard that can be present or that a worker may experience without causing a health hazard.
fit testing An evaluation of the way in which a respirator fits the wearer. The three forms of fit testing are general, qualitative, and quantitative.
gas and vapor respirator A respirator containing chemical filters made to protect against specific gas and vapor hazards. This type does not filter airborne particles or mist.
general fit testing An assessment of the suitability of a respirator for the wearer that assures that the facemask will stay tight under various positions and conditions.
generated aerosol fit test A type of quantitative fit test that measures the number of tiny solid or liquid particles suspended in the atmosphere.
grimacing Making an exaggerated, unpleasant facial expression.
hazardous breathing environment Air in the workplace surroundings that is contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors. Employees must wear respirators when working in hazardous breathing environments.
IDLH Immediately dangerous to life and health. IDLH atmospheres are capable of causing death, irreversible adverse health effects, or the impairment of an individual's ability to escape from a dangerous atmosphere.
immediately dangerous to life and health An atmosphere that poses an immediate threat to life, would cause irreversible adverse health effects, or would impair an individual's ability to escape from a dangerous atmosphere. A smoke-filled room in a burning building is considered IDLH.
isoamyl acetate A chemical known for its banana-like odor. Isoamyl acetate is used in qualitative fit testing.
material safety data sheet Mandatory information that must accompany almost every chemical in the workplace except for items like cleaning supplies. An MSDS includes details such as the precautions and first aid procedures associated with exposure to a chemical.
musculoskeletal Muscles, joints, bones, and related structures.
negative pressure respirator A respirator in which the air pressure inside the facemask becomes lower than the ambient air pressure when the wearer inhales.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration A government agency under the U.S. Dept. of Labor that helps employers reduce injuries, illnesses, and deaths in the workplace.
odor threshold screening An assessment of the subject's ability to detect the presence of a substance prior to putting on a respirator.
particulate respirator A type of air-purifying respirator that captures contaminant particles, such as dust and mold, in a fibrous filter.
pneumonia A respiratory disease characterized by inflammation of the lungs.
positive pressure respirator A respirator in which the pressure inside the respiratory inlet covering exceeds the ambient air pressure outside the respirator.
pulmonary disease An illness of the lungs and respiratory system, such as emphysema.
qualitative fit test A pass or fail assessment of the adequacy of a respirator. A qualitative fit test determines whether or not someone can detect various scents or flavors or can experience a negative reaction to a substance that can cause burning, watering eyes.
quantitative fit test An assessment of the adequacy of respirator fit that uses numerical measurement of the amount of leakage into the respirator. Quantitative fit tests use a probe inside the facemask.
respirator A breathing device worn to prevent inhalation of hazardous substances. Respirators may purify air from the environment or supply air to the wearer.
respiratory protection program A permanent written program containing work-specific procedures for using respirators.
respiratory protection program administrator An individual fully trained in the use of respirators who oversees the use of breathing equipment in the workplace. The administrator implements the written respiratory protection program.
saccharine An artificial sweetener. Saccharine is used in qualitative fit testing.
self-contained breathing apparatus An atmosphere-supplying respirator for which the breathing air source is designed to be carried by the user. A SCBA wearer must be capable of carrying the weight of an air tank.
silicosis A chronic lung disease caused by inhalation of the mineral silica.
stannic chloride A colorless liquid chemical that fumes upon contact with air. Stannic chloride is used in qualitative fit testing.
taste threshold screening An assessment of the subject's ability to detect the presence of a substance prior to putting on a respirator.
vapor The gaseous form of a substance that is a liquid or solid at normal temperatures. Water vaporizes into steam when heated.