Metal Cutting

Metal cutting involves removing metal through machining operations. Machining traditionally takes place on lathes, drill presses, and milling machines with the use of various cutting tools. Successful machining also requires knowledge about the material you are cutting.
These classes will explain all aspects of metal cutting. The content is for individuals who need to understand the processes and products that make metal cutting possible. Content addresses the common tooling setups and operations as well as specialized applications for the more experienced users.


Class Functional Area Format Difficulty Version Department
123
Classes 1 to 10 of 25
Intro to EDM 100

This class introduces the process, components and machines of electric discharge machining.

Machining Online Beginner 1.0 Metal Cutting
Safety for Metal Cutting 101

Safety for Metal Cutting provides a comprehensive overview of the safety hazards associated with metal cutting operations, such as hot flying chips, broken tools, and rotating components. In addition, the class addresses contact with cutting fluids, which can cause skin ...

Related 1.0 Class:
Safety for Metal Cutting 115
Machining Online Beginner 2.0 Metal Cutting
Cutting Processes 111

Cutting Processes provides an introductory overview of the common metal cutting operations. To those new to manufacturing and machining, familiarity with the basic machines, tools, and principles of metal cutting is essential. The class focuses on the most common machining ...

Related 1.0 Classes:
Metal Removal Processes 110
What Is Cutting? 120
Cutting Processes 140
Machining Online Beginner 2.0 Metal Cutting
Overview of Machine Tools 121

Overview of Machine Tools provides an overview of the basic machine tools used in metal cutting operations. The class describes the appearance, components, and uses of lathes, mills, drill presses, saws, and broaches. Lathes and mills are described in detail, ...

Related 1.0 Class:
Machines for Metal Cutting 130
Machining Online Beginner 2.0 Metal Cutting
Intro to Screw Machining 160

This class identifies the common components and operations of the screw machine and compares common screw machine designs.

Machining Online Beginner 1.0 Metal Cutting
Basic Cutting Theory 201

Basic Cutting Theory provides an introductory overview of metal cutting theory and chip formation. The most fundamental aspect of cutting theory is the use of a cutting tool to remove material in the form of chips. Cutting tools can be ...

Related 1.0 Classes:
What Is Cutting? 120
Cutting Processes 140
Cutting Variables 200
Machining Online Intermediate 2.0 Metal Cutting
Band Saw Operation 211

Band Saw Operation gives an in-depth description of the considerations required for band sawing operations. Band sawing is a common way to perform rough cuts on raw stock, and uses a continuous, flexible metal blade looped over machine wheels. Band ...

Related 1.0 Classes:
Sawing Fundamentals 155
Band Saw Blade Selection 215
Machining Online Intermediate 2.0 Metal Cutting
Introduction to Metal Cutting Fluids 221

Introduction to Metal Cutting Fluids provides an overview of the use of cutting fluids in machining operations, including basic fluid safety and maintenance. Appropriate cutting fluid selection depends on the specific cutting operation and workpiece material, among other factors. Basic ...

Related 1.0 Class:
Cutting Fluids 210
Machining Online Intermediate 2.0 Metal Cutting
Metal Cutting Fluid Safety 231

Metal Cutting Fluid Safety provides an overview of the safety concerns related to working with metal cutting fluids. Some of the ingredients in various cutting fluids, as well as microorganisms that can grow in them, can be harmful. Exposure can ...

Related 1.0 Class:
Metalworking Fluid Safety 165
Machining Online Intermediate 2.0 Metal Cutting
Prints for Metal Cutting Operations 241

"Prints for Metal Cutting Operations" describes the appearance of manufacturing prints, how to interpret the information presented on the print, and the methods that an operator might use to create and measure various part features. Prints for metal cutting use ...

Machining Online Intermediate 2.0 Metal Cutting
FormatFunctional AreaDepartment IDDepartmentClass IDClass NameDescriptionDifficultyVersionLanguageRelated Classes
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting600100 Intro to EDM 100 This class introduces the process, components and machines of electric discharge machining.Beginner1.0English
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260020 Safety for Metal Cutting 101 Safety for Metal Cutting provides a comprehensive overview of the safety hazards associated with metal cutting operations, such as hot flying chips, broken tools, and rotating components. In addition, the class addresses contact with cutting fluids, which can cause skin and eye irritation, and machine guarding. Manual machines often require machine guards because the operator works in close proximity with the point of operation and moving components. CNC machines often have fixed guards, which prevent the operator from reaching into the point of operation. Also, operators must handle all sharp-edged tools properly.Awareness of potential safety hazards reduces the risk of operator injury. The key to cutting safety is to follow the proper guidelines for the facility and maintain a well-organized, safe work environment. After taking the class, users should be able to demonstrate awareness of and follow proper safety protocols in a metal-cutting environment.Beginner2.0English(200115) Safety for Metal Cutting 115
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260010 Cutting Processes 111 Cutting Processes provides an introductory overview of the common metal cutting operations. To those new to manufacturing and machining, familiarity with the basic machines, tools, and principles of metal cutting is essential. The class focuses on the most common machining tools, the saw, lathe, and mill, and the common processes performed on each, such as band sawing, turning, end milling, and drilling. Cutting Processes also offers an introduction to holemaking and describes the differences between inner and outer diameter operations.A basic, foundational knowledge of metal cutting processes is essential to gain understanding of more advanced information such as cutting theory, tool and workpiece material, cutting variables, and tool geometries. After taking this class, students should be able to identify the most common cutting processes, as well as the machines used to perform them.Beginner2.0English(200110) Metal Removal Processes 110; (200120) What Is Cutting? 120; (200140) Cutting Processes 140
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260030 Overview of Machine Tools 121 Overview of Machine Tools provides an overview of the basic machine tools used in metal cutting operations. The class describes the appearance, components, and uses of lathes, mills, drill presses, saws, and broaches. Lathes and mills are described in detail, including the various types of cutting operations performed and the different types of tools commonly used on both machines.This class provides new users with the foundational information about machine tools and their uses that is necessary for users to gain familiarity with common metal cutting machines and knowledge of metal cutting theory and processes. A basic understanding of the types of machine tools used in metal cutting operations will prepare users for becoming machine operators.Beginner2.0English(200130) Machines for Metal Cutting 130
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting200160 Intro to Screw Machining 160 This class identifies the common components and operations of the screw machine and compares common screw machine designs.Beginner1.0English
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260110 Basic Cutting Theory 201 Basic Cutting Theory provides an introductory overview of metal cutting theory and chip formation. The most fundamental aspect of cutting theory is the use of a cutting tool to remove material in the form of chips. Cutting tools can be divided into single-point tools, commonly used on the lathe, and multi-point tools, commonly used in milling and holemaking. The shape and type of chip created by cutting indicates whether or not cutting conditions are optimized. Adjusting tool angles and cutting variables has the largest effect on chip creation and cutting conditions.Understanding how chips are formed and what factors change or optimize chip formation is essential to performing an effective metal cutting operation. Chip formation affects surface finish, part quality, and tool life, and thus has a large effect on manufacturing economy.Intermediate2.0English(200120) What Is Cutting? 120; (200140) Cutting Processes 140; (200200) Cutting Variables 200
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260120 Band Saw Operation 211 Band Saw Operation gives an in-depth description of the considerations required for band sawing operations. Band sawing is a common way to perform rough cuts on raw stock, and uses a continuous, flexible metal blade looped over machine wheels. Band sawing can be performed with a variety of blade materials and styles, including different tooth spacing and geometry. The specific blade type and cutting variables used depend on the specific workpiece and cutting operation.Band sawing can be an efficient, low-cost way to rough cut stock to size. However, in order to effectively perform band sawing operations, operators must be aware of factors such as blade material, tooth set, tooth form, tooth spacing, and optimal speed and feed settings. This class provides the information necessary to identify optimal band sawing variables and conditions.Intermediate2.0English(200155) Sawing Fundamentals 155; (200215) Band Saw Blade Selection 215
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260130 Introduction to Metal Cutting Fluids 221 Introduction to Metal Cutting Fluids provides an overview of the use of cutting fluids in machining operations, including basic fluid safety and maintenance. Appropriate cutting fluid selection depends on the specific cutting operation and workpiece material, among other factors. Basic types of cutting fluids include various combinations of oils, water, and chemicals. Each type is classified by its contents. After explaining the basic function of cutting fluid, the class describes each category of fluid and its benefits and drawbacks.Appropriate cutting fluid use and maintenance are key factors in the success of a cutting operation. Proper cutting fluid application can prolong tool life and improve finished part quality, reducing scrap and tool cost. Awareness of cutting fluid hazards and maintenance helps increase workplace safety and reduce fluid costs. After taking this class, users will be able to identify the common types of cutting fluids and describe their optimal use.Intermediate2.0English(200210) Cutting Fluids 210
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260135 Metal Cutting Fluid Safety 231 Metal Cutting Fluid Safety provides an overview of the safety concerns related to working with metal cutting fluids. Some of the ingredients in various cutting fluids, as well as microorganisms that can grow in them, can be harmful. Exposure can occur through skin contact, inhalation, or ingestion. This exposure can lead to skin and respiratory disorders, including long-term illness. Safety measures, including ventilation, PPE, sanitation, training, and fluid maintenance, can reduce exposure to contaminants.Manufacturers always want to ensure that operators are safe, that they are OSHA compliant, and that they do not lose productivity due to accidents. Operations using cutting fluids have specific safety concerns that must be addressed in order to maintain a safe work environment. After taking this class, users will know how to differentiate between various cutting fluids, recognize the health risks they pose, and understand how to use, handle, and maintain them safely.Intermediate2.0English(850165) Metalworking Fluid Safety 165
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260140 Prints for Metal Cutting Operations 241 "Prints for Metal Cutting Operations" describes the appearance of manufacturing prints, how to interpret the information presented on the print, and the methods that an operator might use to create and measure various part features. Prints for metal cutting use a variety of symbols and shorthand to communicate all the information an operator will need to know to create a part, including dimensions of the part and important part features such as contours, tapers, and holes.An in-depth knowledge of how to read manufacturing prints is essential for any metal cutting operator. Being able to understand prints will also help to improve productivity and quality because operators will be able to quickly assess the best way to make a part and the order in which they should perform metal cutting operations. After taking this course, users will be able to recognize and interpret common print symbols and shorthand and determine how to physically create a part on a print.Intermediate2.0English
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting200260 Toolholders for Turning 260 This class explains the components and identification of OD and ID toolholders used on the lathe.Intermediate1.0English
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260210 Speed and Feed for the Lathe 301 Speed and Feed for the Lathe provides a thorough explanation of cutting variables for lathe operations, including how these variables are measured, selected, and set. Many variables affect speed and feed selection, especially the type of cutting operation, tool material, and workpiece material. The class covers speed and feed selection for both manual and CNC machines.The proper selection of speed and feed is necessary to maximize tool life, productivity, and surface finish. Understanding cutting variables reduces tool wear, damage to machine components, and scrapped parts.Advanced2.0English(200300) Speed and Feed Selection 300
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting200310 High-Speed Machining 310 This class compares high-speed machining to traditional machining and explains the key factors that impact its successful application.Advanced1.0English
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260215 Speed and Feed for the Mill 311 Speed and Feed for the Mill provides a thorough explanation of cutting variables for mill operations, including how these variables are measured, selected, and set. Many variables affect speed and feed selection, primarily the type of cutting operation, tool material, and workpiece material. This class covers speed and feed selection for both manual and CNC machines.The proper selection of speed and feed is necessary to maximize tool life, productivity, and surface finish quality. Without an understanding of cutting variables, tools will wear prematurely, machine components will sustain increased wear and tear, and the number of scrap parts produced will increase.Intermediate2.0English(200300) Speed and Feed Selection 300
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting200315 Hard Turning 315 This class covers hard turning, including its advantages when compared to grinding and strategies for successful implementation.Advanced1.0English
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260220 Cutting Tool Materials 321 Cutting Tool Materials provides an in-depth discussion of various cutting tool materials and their properties. Effective cutting tools combine a handful of valuable properties: hardness, toughness, and wear resistance. Cutting material selection is based primarily on the workpiece material, machine tool, and cutting operation, and involves an appropriate balance of properties. Available cutting tool materials have expanded and improved over the years, ranging from the very tough and inexpensive to the very hard and expensive. Other tool modifications, such as heat treatment and tool coatings, can also improve cutting tools.Selecting the proper cutting tool material is essential for a successful machining operation. The tool material dictates the material removal rate, surface finish and tolerance, and expense to the manufacturer in the form of reduced scrap, extended tool life, production rates, and part quality.Advanced2.0English(200220) Cutting Tool Materials 220
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting200325 Machining Titanium Alloys 325 This class identifies and addresses the challenges related to machining titanium and its alloys.Advanced1.0English
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260230 Carbide Grade Selection 331 Carbide Grade Selection describes the different carbide tool grades and explains how to select the proper grade for a cutting operation. Carbide grades are classified by two systems. The ANSI C-system lists grades of C1 through C8. The ISO classification system designates carbide grades as P, M, and K, followed by a number that further describes the qualities of the carbide. Carbide grade is often dependent on the type of metal used: tungsten, titanium, or tantalum. Grades have different levels of hardness, toughness, and wear resistance. Coating carbide tools can increase wear resistance and part quality.Selecting the correct carbide grade is essential for decreasing manufacturing costs while maximizing tool life, part quality, and production rate. After taking this class, users will be able to identify the different carbide grades and select the proper grade for a particular cutting operation.Advanced2.0English(200230) Carbide Grade Selection 230
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260235 ANSI Insert Selection 341 ANSI Insert Selection provides information on how to identify the qualities and properties of a carbide cutting insert based on its ANSI insert number. Carbide inserts are the most commonly used tools for metal cutting and are manufactured in a variety of types that are optimized for different applications. By learning the ANSI insert nomenclature, users can identify insert shape, clearance angle, tolerance, type, size, thickness, and cutting point among other important features. These features dictate the capabilities and ideal uses of the insert.Users who understand ANSI insert nomenclature can select and order the optimal cutting insert for any given cutting process. Proper tool selection determines part quality, production rate, and tool life and is an essential component in ensuring the efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality of a manufacturing application.Advanced2.0English(200250) ANSI Insert Selection 250
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260236 Advanced Tool Materials 345 Advanced Tool Materials describes advanced metal-cutting tool materials: how they are made and how they are used. Advanced tool materials include cermet, ceramic, cubic boron nitride (CBN), and diamond. Most advanced materials are harder than common tool materials, such as carbide, and they have a range of properties and applications. The primary benefits of advanced tool materials are their ability to cut hard, abrasive, and ductile materials, perform precise cuts, and cut at higher speeds.Many workpiece materials, such as superalloys and cast iron, respond best to being cut with advanced tool materials. Advanced materials can also improve the efficiency and accuracy of machining operations. An operator who understands advanced tool materials will be able to cut more kinds of materials effectively, increasing flexibility and reducing scrap and waste. After taking this course, users will know the various types of advanced tool materials as well as how and when to use them.Advanced2.0English
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260240 Lathe Tool Geometry 351 Lathe Tool Geometry provides a description of single-point lathe tool angles, detailing the effect these angles have on a cutting operation. Tool angles have a significant impact on a cutting operation, as each angle offers a tradeoff between cutting-edge strength and improved tool service life, among other factors. Cutting tool angles must be optimized to each unique combination of workpiece material, tool material, cutting application, and desired surface finish quality.Improper tool geometry leads to premature tool wear and failure, poor surface finish, and slower speed and feed rates. These factors increase manufacturing costs, create excess waste and scrapped parts, and slow production rates. After taking this course, users will be able to better identify and implement proper tool geometry for lathe cutting processes to improve production efficiency and maximize tool service life.Advanced2.0English(200240) Tool Geometry 240
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260244 Mill Tool Geometry 361 Mill Tool Geometry provides an overview of the possible tool angles and insert features for a multi-point milling cutter, detailing the affect each angle has on a cutting operation. The various angles, such as the axial rake and radial rake, and their positioning offer tradeoffs between cutting edge strength and cutting forces, among other important factors. Mill tool geometry must be optimized to each unique combination of workpiece material, tool material, and part feature.Improper tool geometry leads to premature tool wear or failure, poor surface finish, and slower speed and feed rates. These issues can increase manufacturing costs, create waste and scrapped parts, and slow production rates. After taking this class, users will be able to identify the various angles involved in mill tool geometry and implement the proper tool geometry for mill cutting processes.Advanced2.0English(200245) Milling Geometry 245
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260248 Drill Tool Geometry 371 Drill Tool Geometry provides an overview of each tool angle for a drill, including point angle and helix angle, and details the impact that each angle has on a cutting operation. Changing the size of each cutting angle offers a tradeoff between cutting edge strength and cutting forces. Cutting tool angles must be optimized to each unique combination of workpiece material, tool material, and part feature.Proper drill geometry can prolong tool life, optimize finished part quality, and greatly improve productivity. After taking this class, users will be able to identify and implement proper tool geometry for dill cutting processes. Improper drill tool geometry leads to premature tool wear and failure, poor surface finish, and slower speed and feed rates. Poor drill geometry can also cause deflection, which creates holes at incorrect locations and with poor tolerance. These issues increase manufacturing costs, create waste and scrapped parts, and slow production rates.Advanced2.0English(200247) Drill Geometry 247
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260250 Optimizing Tool Life and Process 381 Optimizing Tool Life and Process provides a detailed overview of the various considerations necessary for prolonging cutting tool life. This class describes the various types of tool wear and provides explanations for how each type of wear occurs, as well as ways to reduce and prevent them. Cutting tool wear types include flank wear, crater wear, notch wear, built-up edge (BUE), plastic deformation, thermal cracking, chipping, chip hammering, and fracture.Tool cost is a significant component of overall manufacturing expenditures. Additionally, longer tool life leads to higher production rates, as it reduces the time spent indexing or changing out cutting tools. By learning to recognize, lessen, and possibly prevent tool wear, operators can prolong tool life, reduce tool cost, and improve productivity. After taking this class, users will be able to identify common types of tool wear and strategies to reduce or prevent them from occurring.Advanced2.0English(200305) Optimizing Insert Life 305
OnlineMachining200Metal Cutting260260 Impact of Workpiece Materials 391 Impact of Workpiece Materials gives a detailed overview of the various types of workpiece materials, how they can be processed, and the challenges posed by each. Ferrous and nonferrous metals are the most common workpiece materials, and each metal has different properties and cutting tool compatibility. Non-metallic materials, such as carbides, ceramics, plastics, and composites, may require machining processes. These materials have very unique qualities, and thus have specific requirements regarding cutting tools and cutting conditions.A working knowledge of the different varieties of workpieces, their properties, and how to process them, is indispensable. In addition to understanding cutting tool properties, familiarity with the properties and demands of workpieces ensures that operators can capably run any operation. Optimizing cutting conditions leads to better products, higher output, and reduced manufacturing costs.Advanced2.0English