Design for Manufacturability and Assembly (DFM/DFA)

DFM is the classic method of creating good product designs that reduce part count, simplify manufacturing techniques, and standardize parts and materials with the ultimate goal of developing a quality product at the lowest cost while saving time. The primary advantage of the design for assembly (DFA) methodology is that it ensures a good design early in the design process before much effort and cost has been expended in pursuing an ineffective design.

Class Details

Class Name:
Design for Manufacturability and Assembly (DFM/DFA)
Description:
DFM is the classic method of creating good product designs that reduce part count, simplify manufacturing techniques, and standardize parts and materials with the ultimate goal of developing a quality product at the lowest cost while saving time. The primary advantage of the design for assembly (DFA) methodology is that it ensures a good design early in the design process before much effort and cost has been expended in pursuing an ineffective design.
Audience:
Anyone involved in product design, manufacturing engineering, and manufacturing management, including design engineers, product engineers, manufacturing engineers, process engineers, quality engineers, and mechanical engineers.
Duration:
3 Day Course
Language:
English

Learning Objectives

  • Understand how DFM impacts product cost and quality
  • Identify ways to simplify your product and dramatically reduce part count
  • Understand the six principles of mistake-proofing (poka-yoke) and how to proactively apply it
  • Learn the principles of design for assembly for both mechanical and electronic products
  • Obtain detailed guidelines of DFM covering fabrication processes used by your company
  • Learn by doing through a series of exercises
  • See hundreds of examples of good and bad design for manufacturability
  • Learn how to optimize tolerances to enhance manufacturability
  • Determine the 10 key steps to DFM implementation
  • Learn a practical methodology for analyzing the manufacturability of your company's products
  • Obtain practical DFM feedback on your existing products or products under development

Outline At-a-Glance

1. DESIGN FOR MANUFACTURABILITY/ ASSEMBLY (DFM/A)

  • DFM/A Introduction
  • Design Impact on Cost
  • DFM/A Fallacies vs. Reality

2. DESIGN FOR ASSEMBLY

  • Principles of Design for Assembly
  • Simplicity - Minimize Part Count and Consolidate Part Functions
  • Minimize Parts Exercise
  • Commonality and Standardization - Minimize Part Variety
  • Commonality and Standardization Approach and Method
  • Mistake-Proof Fabrication and Assembly - The Six Mistake-Proofing Principles and the Relative Benefit
  • Mistake-Proofing Approach and Methodology
  • Mistake-Proofing Exercise - Identify Mistake-Proofing Opportunities
  • Assembly Process Framework
  • Design for Parts Feeding & Handling
  • Automated Assembly Handling and Feeding
  • Design for Part Orientation
  • Design for Location and Insertion
  • Axes of Assembly, Reorientation & Blind Assembly
  • Top Down, Uni-Axis Assembly
  • Self-Fixturing vs. Production Fixtures
  • Joining & Fastening Guidelines
  • Finishing, Adjustment & Calibration
  • DFA Considerations to Facilitate Inspection
  • Applying DFA to Packaging - The Final Assembly Step
  • Design for Assembly Analysis Exercise

3. DFM/A FOR ELECTRONICS

  • Use of DFM/A Guidelines for Boards
  • Simplify the Assembly Process - Mixing Technology and Board Sides
  • Reduce Thermal Cycles
  • Board Size and Penalization Guidelines
  • PCB Layout Guidelines
  • Component Selection Guidelines
  • Avoid Manual Assembly
  • Other Component Considerations
  • DFM/A Assessment for Boards
  • Automated Design Rules Checking

4. DESIGN FOR MANUFACTURABILITY

  • DFM Framework
  • Material and Process Evaluation
  • Material and Process Evaluation Exercise
  • Raw Material Standardization
  • General DFM Guidelines
  • Machining Guidelines and Examples
  • Manufacturability Analysis Exercise
  • Sheet Metal and Stamping Guidelines and Examples
  • Injection Molding Guidelines and Examples
  • Casting Guidelines and Examples
  • Minimize Finishing Requirements
  • Design for the Supply Chain

5. PROCESS CAPABILITY AND TOLERANCES

  • What is Process Capability and the Effect on Manufacturability
  • Variation and Specifications
  • Parameter and Tolerance Objectives
  • Statistical Process Capability and Capabilities Indices - Cp and Cpk
  • Effect of Tolerances
  • Tolerance Optimization

6. DFM/A AND THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

  • DFM/A Process Steps
  • Early Manufacturing Involvement
  • Early Supplier Involvement
  • DFM/A Collaboration Tools and Methods
  • Role of Solids and Assembly Models in DFM/A Evaluation
  • How to Effectively Consider Design Alternatives to Address DFM/A Issues
  • Product Cost Models to Estimate Costs & Evaluate Design Alternatives
  • Developing Design Guidelines
  • Formal DFM/A Analysis & Assessment
  • Design for Manufacturability and Assembly (DFM/A)
  • Conducting Design Reviews to Address DFM/A
  • Capturing Issues with Build Reports
  • Closing the Loop with a Final Production Review
  • DFM/A Performance Measurement & Metrics

7. SUMMARY

  • 10 Steps to DFM/A
  • DFM/A Survey Results
  • Sources of Further Information
  • Questions and Discussion

8. DFM/A ANALYSIS OF COMPANY PRODUCT OR ASSEMBLY (DAY 3 WORKING LAB)

  • Transitioning from the Workshop to Product Design - Exercise Objectives
  • Introduction of Analysis Methodology and DFM/A Worksheet
  • Team Analysis of Company Products or Assemblies
  • Team Consideration of DFM/A Improvements
  • Team Reporting Out and Exercise Discussion

9. CONCLUDING QUESTIONS AND DISCUSSION

Job Roles