Department of Transportation Hazard Communication Overview 153

"Department of Transportation Hazard Communication Overview 153" describes the Hazard Materials Regulations (HMR) of the U.S. Department of Transportation, which govern the proper marking and labeling of hazardous material in transport. Particular attention is paid to the nine hazard classes designated by the HMR, such as explosives and radioactive materials. The HMR requires that Department of Transportation diamond labels be present on various containers, packaging, and vehicles transporting hazardous materials.

After completing this course, users will be able to identify the basic hazard communications on shipping labels and understand best practices for handling transported hazardous materials.

Class Details

Class Name:
Department of Transportation Hazard Communication Overview 153
Difficulty:
Beginner
Number of Lessons:
10

Class Outline

  • Department of Transportation Hazard Communication
  • Hazardous Materials
  • HMR Markings
  • HMR Labeling
  • Review: HMR Markings and Labels
  • Explosives and Gases Hazard Classes
  • Fire Hazard Classes
  • Additional Hazard Classes
  • Handling Transported Hazardous Materials
  • Review: HMR Hazard Classes

Objectives

  • Describe DOT Hazardous Materials Regulations.
  • Describe hazardous materials covered by the HMR.
  • Describe HMR marking requirements and common markings.
  • Describe HMR labeling requirements.
  • Describe the explosives and gases hazard classes.
  • Describe the fire hazard classes.
  • Describe the four additional hazard classes.
  • Describe best practices for handling transported hazardous materials.

Job Roles

Certifications

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
biological cultures A common laboratory means in order to study living organisms, such as cells, tissues, or organs. Biological cultures are potentially infectious substances.
corrosives A chemical solid, liquid, or gas that is capable of irreparably harming living tissues or of damaging material on contact. Corrosive chemicals include acids and certain organic materials.
cyanides A salt or ester of hydrocyanic acid. Cyanides are generally extremely toxic.
Department of Transportation DOT. A department of the U.S. government concerned with the movement of people and goods from one location to another. The Department of Transportation regulates its own system of hazard communication labels.
depleted uranium A dense metal produced as a by-product of enrichment of natural uranium for nuclear fuel. Depleted uranium is still radioactive, but at a much lower level than the starting material.
DOT Department of Transportation. A department of the U.S. government concerned with the movement of people and goods from one location to another. The DOT regulates its own system of hazard communication labels.
DOT diamond label A system of labeling hazardous chemicals during transportation. DOT diamond labels must be affixed to shipping containers.
Emergency Response Guidebook A publication of the Department of Transportation to help when responding to transportation emergencies involving hazardous materials. The Emergency Response Guidebook complies with the requirement that hazardous materials shipments be accompanied with emergency response information.
explosives A material that can rapidly detonate or catch fire as the result of a chemical reaction. Examples of explosives are ammunition and fireworks.
flammable liquids A liquid with a flashpoint of 60 to 65° C or lower or a liquid transported at temperatures at or above its flashpoint. Flammable liquids include diesel fuel and gasoline.
flammable solids A material that is readily combustible under conditions that are common during transport. Flammable solids include matches and metal powders.
gases A substance that is completely gaseous at 20 degrees Celsius. Examples of gases are natural gas and propane.
genetically modified organisms Any organism altered using genetic engineering techniques. Genetic modification creates combinations of plant, animal, bacteria, and virus genes that do not occur in nature or through traditional crossbreeding methods.
hazard classes A category of a material according to its potential hazard. The DOT requires labeling of nine hazard classes.
Hazard Communication Standard HCS. An established OSHA policy that sets guidelines for hazard communication. The HCS emphasizes labeling and training for hazardous materials in the workplace.
hazardous material Any substance that the Department of Transportation has determined can pose an unreasonable risk to health, safety, and property when transported in commerce. Hazardous materials may pose physical hazards or health hazards.
Hazardous Materials Regulations HMR. A set of Department of Transportation standards for hazard communication. The Hazardous Materials Regulations include the use of DOT diamond labels on containers of hazardous materials in transport.
Hazardous Materials Table The Hazardous Materials Table designates the materials listed therein as hazardous materials for the purpose of transportation of those materials. For each listed material, the Hazardous Materials Table identifies the hazard class or specifies that the material is forbidden in transportation.
hazardous waste Disposable matter that poses a risk to human health or the environment. Hazardous waste requires special types of storage and disposal to make it harmless or less dangerous.
health hazard Any chemical that can cause an acute reaction, chronic effect, or both. These chemicals may compromise a person's health and safety.
HMR Hazardous Materials Regulations. A set of Department of Transportation standards for hazard communication. The HMR include the use of DOT diamond labels on containers of hazardous materials in transport.
infectious substances Material that is known to or likely to contain pathogens that can cause disease in humans and animals. Examples of infectious substances include biological cultures and medical waste.
ionizing radiation The excess energy emitted during radioactive decay. Ionizing radiation is extremely dangerous to human health.
keep away from heat marking A printed or affixed image of a package insulated from the sun, indicating that a container must be kept away from heat for the safe transport of the hazardous materials inside. Keep away from heat markings are one of the most common marking types used under Department of Transportation regulations.
label A printed form of identification on or affixed to a container. The DOT requires that labels for hazardous materials have specific information about their hazards.
labels A printed form of identification on or affixed to a container. The DOT requires that labels for hazardous materials have specific information about their hazards.
lithium-ion batteries A type of rechargeable battery. Lithium-ion batteries are commonly used for portable electronics and electric vehicles.
marking A printed combination of images, letters, numbers, or words used to provide information about the contents of a container. A marking can be instructions, cautions, weight, other specifications, or combinations thereof, required on the outer containers of hazardous materials.
medical isotopes A form of a chemical element that has a different-from-normal atomic mass. Medical isotopes are used in a number of medical tests because they can produce images of tissues that can be used to detect diseases or conditions.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA. A government agency under the Department of Labor that sets the standards for working conditions in the U.S. OSHA ensures that employees work in safe and healthy environments.
organic peroxides A substance that is hydrogen peroxide where organic radicals have replaced one or both of the hydrogen atoms in the chemical structure. Organic peroxides are used as accelerators, catalysts, and in other applications.
oxidizing substances A substance that may contribute to or cause combustion by yielding oxygen as the result of a chemical reaction. Oxidizing substances are also known as oxidizers.
package orientation marking A printed or affixed image of arrows, indicating the necessary orientation of a container for the safe transport of the hazardous materials inside. Package orientation markings are one of the most common marking types used under Department of Transportation regulations.
physical hazard Any chemical that could cause bodily harm from injuries such as burns. These chemicals may be reactive, to themselves or other substances, in a variety of ways.
pictograms A graphic symbol used to communicate specific information about the hazards of a chemical. Pictograms can indicate that a material is fatally toxic or explosive, for example.
placards A larger version of a label placed on transport vehicles and bulk packages of a larger size. Due to their size, placards are generally more durable.
radioactive material Material that contains atoms that are subject to radioactive decay. Radioactive material emits ionizing radiation.
substance A chemical element or compound. Substances may exist in the form of solids, liquids, or gases, and may consist of one element, such as hydrogen, or a combination of elements, such as water.
toxic substances A substance that could cause serious injury, harm, or death to a human if inhaled, swallowed, or allowed to come into contact with skin. Examples of toxic substances are cyanide and arsenic.
U.S. Code of Federal Regulations The codification of the general and permanent rules and regulations published in the Federal Register by the executive departments and agencies of the federal government of the United States. The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations sets the Hazardous Materials Table.