Flammable/Combustible Liquids 191

“Flammable and Combustible Liquids” describes procedures required to safely handle, store, and dispose of dangerous liquids. Flammable and combustible liquids are divided into different categories or classifications based on properties such as flash and boiling points. Anyone who must handle or transfer these liquids must take precautions such as bonding and grounding to prevent accidental ignition. OSHA requires proper hazard communication and written procedures for any process involving flammable and combustible liquids, and details various standards for methods of storage, transfer, and safe disposal.

Proper handling, storing, and disposing of flammable and combustible liquids prevents costly and potentially deadly fires in the workplace. "Flammable and Combustible Liquids" provides users with information on liquid hazards as well as safe methods of storage, handling, transfer, use, and disposal.

Class Details

Class Name:
Flammable/Combustible Liquids 191
Version:
2.0
Difficulty:
Beginner
Number of Lessons:
24
Related 1.0 Class:
Flammable/Combustible Liquids 155

Class Outline

  • The Dangers of Flammable and Combustible Liquids
  • What are Flammable and Combustible Liquids?
  • Categories of Flammable Liquids
  • Classes of Combustible Liquids
  • Classifying Flammable and Combustible Liquids
  • Flammable Liquid Classes Review
  • Flammable and Combustible Liquid Labeling
  • SDS and Hazard Communication for Hazardous Liquids
  • Creating a Plan for Using Flammable Liquids
  • Preventing Static Electricity
  • Bonding and Grounding
  • The Mechanics of Bonding and Grounding
  • Knowledge Review
  • Transferring Flammable Liquids
  • Transferring Flammable Liquids Review
  • Storage Fundamentals
  • Safety Cans
  • Waste and Residue
  • Storage Cabinets
  • Storage Rooms
  • Storage Review
  • Fire Prevention
  • Fire Control
  • Final Review

Objectives

  • Describe OSHA flammable liquid safety regulations for employers.
  • Distinguish between a flammable liquid and a combustible liquid.
  • Distinguish between categories of flammable liquids.
  • Distinguish between classes of combustible liquids.
  • Distinguish between classes of combustible liquids. Distinguish between categories of flammable liquids.
  • Describe the labeling requirements for flammable and combustible liquids.
  • Describe required information sources for flammable and combustible liquids.
  • Describe the components of a flammable liquids safety plan.
  • Describe static electricity.
  • Describe bonding and grounding.
  • Identify OSHA-approved methods for transferring flammable liquids.
  • Describe OSHA guidelines for storing flammable liquids.
  • Describe OSHA-approved safety cans.
  • Identify OSHA-approved methods for disposing of waste and residue.
  • Describe OSHA-approved storage cabinets.
  • Describe OSHA-approved flammable storage rooms. Explain the purpose of flammable storage rooms.
  • Identify the factors that produce a fire.
  • Explain strategies for fire control in the workplace.

Job Roles

Certifications

NIMS
  • CNC Lathe Operations
  • CNC Milling Operations
  • CNC Milling Programming, Setup, & Operation
  • CNC Turning Programming, Setup, & Operation
  • Drill Press I
  • Grinding I
  • Job Planning, Benchwork, & Layout I
  • Measurement, Materials, & Safety I
  • Milling I
  • Turning Operations: Turning Chucking Skills

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
boiling point The temperature at which a liquid changes to a vapor. The boiling point and flash point of a flammable liquid determine its category.
bond wire A metal wire that connects two objects to reduce the buildup of electrical charges between them. Bond wires are used when transferring flammable and combustible liquids from one container to another.
bonding Physically connecting two electrically conductive objects to eliminate any difference in their static charge potential. Metal containers are often bonded using a metallic bond wire.
Category 1 liquids A flammable liquid with a flash point under 73.4°F (23°C) and a boiling point at or below 95°F (35°C).
Category 2 liquids A flammable liquid with a flash point under 73.4°F (23°C) and a boiling point above 95°F (35°C).
Category 3 liquids A flammable liquid with a flash point at or above 73.4°F (23°C) and a boiling point at or below 140°F (60°C).
Category 4 liquids A flammable liquid with a flash point at or above 140°F (60°C) and a boiling point at or below 200°F (93°C).
Class II A combustible liquid with a flash point between 100°F (37.8°C) and 140°F (60°C). Class II is the most dangerous of the combustible liquid classes.
Class III A combustible liquid with a flash point at or over 140°F (60°C). Class III liquids are divided into subclasses IIIA and IIIB.
Class IIIA A combustible liquid with a flash point between 140°F (60°C) and 200°F (93.3°C). Class IIIA is a subclass of Class III liquids.
Class IIIB A combustible liquid with a flash point at or over 200°F (93.3°C). Class IIIB is a subclass of Class III liquids.
closed piping systems A piping system used to transport liquids that is sealed to prevent vapors. Closed piping systems help prevent fires due to flammable or combustible liquids.
combustible Any substance that is capable of igniting and burning. Combustible liquids require special storage and labeling.
combustible liquid A liquid that will ignite if it reaches its flash point and is provided with an ignition source. Combustible liquids have a flash point above 100°F (37.8°C).
drum bung opening The opening located on the top of a storage drum. Flammable and combustible liquids are transferred from drums to smaller containers via the drum bung opening.
drums A large metal storage container used for storing substances such as flammable and combustible liquids. OSHA-approved drums for flammable liquid storage must be equipped with safety features such as safety vents.
electrical conductivity The ability of a material to act as a medium for conveying electricity. Metal has good electrical conductivity, while plastic and glass do not.
fire flashback The explosion of a container caused by a fire that occurs outside the container. Fire flashback occurs when flame enters the container through the flammable or combustible liquid's vapors.
fire flashback The explosion of a container caused by a fire that occurs outside the container. Fire flashback occurs when flame enters the container through the flammable or combustible liquid's vapors.
flame arrester screen A mechanical device designed to prevent the buildup of flammable vapors and quickly extinguish a fire in a flammable liquids container. Flame arrester screens are made of double mesh wire and extend inside the container from its nozzle.
flammable An object or substance that can quickly catch fire. Flammable items ignite at low temperatures.
flammable liquid A liquid that will ignite if it reaches its flash point and is provided with an ignition source. Flammable liquids have a flash point below 100°F (38°C) and can typically ignite at room temperature.
flammable storage room A room used for storing various materials used in production. OSHA requires storage rooms to have an approved ventilation system for storing large amounts of flammable and combustible liquids.
flash point The lowest temperature at which a liquid produces enough vapor to form an ignitable mixture. Liquids with low flash points pose the greatest danger.
Globally Harmonized System GHS. A method of labeling chemicals that is standardized worldwide. GHS information must appear on all hazardous chemical labels.
ground wire A metal wire that connects an object to a copper rod driven into the earth. Grounding using a ground wire helps prevent the buildup of static electricity.
grounding Using a wire to connect a conductive object to the ground. Grounding carries electrical charges away from objects to prevent the buildup of static electricity.
hazard communication The means through which employers inform their employees about hazards in the workplace. Hazard communication includes training and SDS.
ignition source Any process or event capable of causing a fire or explosion. Open flames, sparks, static electricity, and hot surfaces are all possible ignition sources.
ignition sources Any process or event capable of causing a fire or explosion. Open flames, sparks, static electricity, and hot surfaces are all possible ignition sources.
incipient stage fire A fire in its beginning stage. Incipient stage fires can be controlled with portable fire extinguishers and small hose systems.
isopropyl alcohol A flammable liquid commonly used as a cleaning solvent and medical disinfectant. Isopropyl alcohol is also referred to as rubbing alcohol.
naphthalene A carbon-based chemical derived from coal tar. Naphthalene is used to manufacture dyes and resins.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA. A government agency under the U.S. Dept. of Labor that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States. OSHA ensures that employees work in safe and healthy environments.
oily waste cans A container used for disposing rags soaked in flammable and combustible liquids. The oily waste can features a self-closing lid.
oxygen A colorless, odorless gas present in the air. Oxygen is necessary for breathing, but is also flammable.
safety can A portable container that holds one to five gallons of flammable or combustible liquid. Safety cans must include features such as a safety vent.
safety cans A portable container that holds one to five gallons of flammable or combustible liquids. Safety cans must include features such as a safety vent.
Safety Data Sheet SDS. Mandatory information that must accompany almost every chemical in the workplace, including flammable and combustible liquids. An SDS includes details such as the risks, precautions, and first aid procedures associated with the chemical.
safety disposal can A container used for safely storing and disposing of up to five gallons (19 liters) of industrial waste. Safety disposal cans are often used for flammable and combustible liquids.
safety pumps An OSHA-approved device used to transfer liquids from storage drums to portable containers. The safety pump attaches directly to the drum's opening, and is faster and safer than the self-closing faucet.
safety vents An opening that helps prevent the contents of a container from reaching temperatures that would cause them to explode. Safety vents are found on most OSHA-approved containers for flammable and combustible liquids.
self-closing safety faucets An OSHA-approved device used to transfer liquids from storage drums to portable containers. Self-closing safety faucets must be used with a bond wire connecting the storage drum and the nozzle of the portable container.
spring-closing lid A lid that uses spring action to close automatically after use. Spring-closing lids limit the amount of oxygen exposure and fire risk when storing flammable and combustible liquids.
static electricity An electrical charge that builds up due to friction between two dissimilar materials. Static electricity is an ignition source for flammable liquids.
storage cabinet An enclosed container with shelving used to store various industrial materials. OSHA-approved storage cabinets for flammable and combustible liquids must include certain specific safety features.
three-point lock A locking mechanism installed on storage cabinet doors that secures doors at the top, bottom, and sides. The three-point lock is required by OSHA to secure cabinets containing flammable and combustible liquids.
vapors The gaseous form of a substance that is a liquid or solid at lower temperatures. The vapors of flammable and combustible liquids can ignite if fire or sparks are present.
waste drum A container used for storing and disposing of large amounts of flammable and combustible liquid waste. Waste drums can commonly hold up to 55 gallons (208 liters) of liquid.