Design for Serviceability 220

“Design for Serviceability” introduces the Design for Serviceability methodology and its application to manufacturing processes. Design for Serviceability and other Design for X methods are systematic approaches to product and process design that focus on developing products at the lowest cost and highest quality. Design for Serviceability simplifies and standardizes manufacturing processes so products have lower lifecycle costs.

A primary advantage of Design for Serviceability is that designs account for the lifespan and quality of a product early in the design process. Serviceability includes many lifecycle costs of a product including maintenance, repairs, upgrades, and more. This approach prevents or reduces the need for costly re-designs and repairs. After taking this class, users will understand Design for Serviceability methodologies and gain insight into the development processes and benefits of service reduction.

Class Details

Class Name:
Design for Serviceability 220
Difficulty:
Intermediate
Number of Lessons:
11

Class Outline

  • Introduction to Design for Serviceability
  • Benefits of Design for Serviceability
  • Design for Serviceability Program
  • Review: Design for Serviceability
  • Preventative Maintenance
  • Standardization
  • Design for Assembly
  • Location
  • Diagnostics
  • Safety and Reliability
  • Final Review

Objectives

  • Describe Design for Serviceability.
  • Describe the benefits of Design for Serviceability.
  • Describe the processes and guidelines of Design for Serviceability.
  • Describe preventative maintenance methods.
  • Describe standardization.
  • Describe Design for Assembly.
  • Describe location considerations for Design for Serviceability.
  • Describe tools and processes for diagnosing product failure.
  • Describe safety and reliability in Design for Service.

Job Roles

Certifications

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
chamfers A small, angled surface added on the end of a shaft, around the opening of a hole, or along an edge. A chamfer removes the sharp edge and helps remove burrs.
computerized maintenance management system CMMS. A technology and software package that organize and track data about a company's maintenance operations. Computerized maintenance and management systems are an important tool for preventative and predictive maintenance schedules.
concurrent engineering Cooperative design among multiple departments, disciplines, backgrounds, and skill sets within a company. Concurrent engineering, also known as Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD), is fundamental to Design for X.
condition-based maintenance Predictive maintenance. Techniques and technologies that diagnose and track the condition of in-service equipment in order to estimate maintenance needs. Condition-based maintenance relies on CMMS technology to track maintenance related data.
coolants A cutting fluid used to decrease the temperature of the tool and the workpiece. Coolant can contain oil, water, or synthetics.
Design for Assembly DFA. A form of Integrated Product and Process Development that focuses on simplifying and streamlining assembly processes. Design for Assembly minimizes the total product cost by targeting assembly time, part cost, and the assembly process at the design stage of the product development cycle.
Design for Cost DFC. A form of concurrent engineering that focuses on reducing a product's total cost and lifecycle cost. Design for Cost is the iterative design of a product that seeks to increase system performance while reducing cost.
Design for Manufacturing DFM. A form of Integrated Product and Process Development that focuses on designing, manufacturing, testing, and creating a part that functions correctly and is easy to manufacture. Design for Manufacturing involves considering part functionality and the limits of the manufacturing process.
Design for Serviceability DFS. A form of concurrent engineering that focuses on reducing and simplifying the maintenance and repair of products. Design for Serviceability is closely connected to Design for Assembly.
Design for X DFX. A methodology that requires all decisions related to products, processes, costs, and constraints be made early on in the development process. Design for X encompasses many areas and processes of design, including Design for Manufacturing.
DFA Design for Assembly. A form of Integrated Product and Process Development that focuses on simplifying and streamlining assembly processes. DFA minimizes the total product cost by targeting assembly time, part cost, and the assembly process at the design stage of the product development cycle.
DFS Design for Serviceability. A form of concurrent engineering that focuses on reducing and simplifying the maintenance and repair of products. DFS is closely connected to Design for Assembly.
ergonomics The science of designing workplaces and processes to maximize employee effectiveness while minimizing the possibility of physical harm. Ergonomic concerns include force, posture, and repetition.
failure modes and effect analysis An approach for finding failures in a design or process. Failure modes and effect analysis ranks failures according to their effects, likelihood, and ability to be found.
failure reporting and corrective action systems FRACAS. An approach that provides a process for finding, organizing, and analyzing failures, and planning corrective actions. Failure reporting and corrective action systems often uses software.
fasteners A device that holds objects together or locates them in relation to one another. Fasteners are simplified and reduced when using Design for Serviceability.
Integrated Product and Process Development IPPD. Cooperative design among multiple departments, disciplines, backgrounds, and skill sets within a company. Integrated Product and Process Development, also known as concurrent engineering, is fundamental to Design for X.
Integrated Product and Process Team IPPT. A multi-disciplinary group of employees focused on concurrent engineering and product design. The Integrated Product and Process Team includes service engineers, technicians, and other service staff when implementing design for service.
iterative Repeating actions and steps in processes. Iterative design is an important aspect of Design for X because it allows for constant and quick redesigns during initial stages.
lifecycle The series of stages a product goes through from conception to the end of its useful life. The product lifecycle includes design, production, distribution, and end use by the customer.
lubricants A substance that reduces or prevents friction, resistance, heat, and wear during a variety of manufacturing processes. Lubricants include oil, grease, and graphite.
Mean Time Between Failure MTBF. The length of time between part issues and service needs that leads to failure of the system. Mean Time Between Failure is increased by Design for Serviceability.
modular designs Independent parts with standardized interfaces that allow for interchangeability and use across many projects. Modular designs provide greater efficiency.
nondestructive testing A category of inspection processes that evaluate a part's properties and performance using methods that do not damage or permanently alter the part. Nondestructive test methods include visual testing, liquid penetrant testing, magnetic particle testing, eddy current testing, ultrasonic testing, and radiographic testing.
Poka-yoke A Japanese term meaning mistake proofing. Poka-yoke is an error prevention method that eliminates operator errors in production or assembly.
predictive maintenance Condition-based maintenance. Techniques and technologies that diagnose and track the condition of in-service equipment in order to estimate maintenance needs. Predictive maintenance relies on CMMS technology to track maintenance related data.
preventative maintenance PM. A type of maintenance performed while a component is in working order to keep it from breaking down. Preventive maintenance may include lubricating, tightening, and replacing worn parts.
quality function deployment QFD. A tool for translating customer needs into product designs. Quality function deployment uses a graph with customer needs listed as inputs and design specifications and resources listed as outputs.
quarter turn fasteners Components that are assembled by rotating 90°. Quarter-turn fasteners lock together with clamping force and are quicker to assemble than traditional fasteners.
reactive maintenance Repairs that are done in response to product and equipment failure. Reactive maintenance often has unintended consequences such as unexpected downtime, higher part costs, shorter product lifespan, and overall greater service costs.
self-test The ability of equipment to track performance, alert operators of issues, and diagnose operational issues. Self-test technology can be used as part of a preventative maintenance schedule.
sensors A device that detects a change in a physical stimulus and turns it into a signal that can be measured or recorded. Sensors may be connected to a machine or system in order to collect operational data that is later analyzed.
service indicator A form of technology that indicates that regular maintenance is needed or that there is an operational issue. Service indicators are often lights that turn on when maintenance is needed.
single-snap features Interlocking components, often made out of metal or plastic, that easily fasten together when force is applied. Single-snap features can simplify assembly since they are fastened by one, quick application of pressure.
standardized Universally recognized and used. Standardized parts can be used for different products to lower costs.
Statistical Process Control SPC. The use of statistics and control charts to measure key quality characteristics and to control the related process. Statistical process control separates special causes of variation from common causes.
tapers A gradual decrease from a larger diameter to a smaller diameter on a cylindrical part. Tapers are often created with turning tools on a lathe.
time-based preventative maintenance Service performed on equipment according to scheduled service and inspection. Time-based preventative maintenance schedules can be tracked manually with computerized maintenance management systems.
time-to-failure The period of usage until product performance fails. Time-to-failure is predicted using collected data in predictive maintenance.
top-down Working from the upper part of equipment to the bottom. Top-down approaches are easier for assembly and service.
ultrasonic testing A nondestructive testing method that uses high-frequency ultrasonic waves to detect internal part discontinuities and defects. During ultrasonic testing, reflected sound waves are converted into electrical signals, which technicians then evaluate for any indications.
usage-based preventative maintenance Service based on product utilization and performance. Usage-based preventative maintenance can be scheduled according to length of time in use, number of product cycles, or other types of measured performance.
variable data Data that can be measured on a scale and compared with other data. Variable data can be added to or subtracted from other variable data sets.