Automatic Identification Technology 141

"Automatic Identification Technology 141" provides an overview of the main methods used to automatically identify and inspect objects, collect data, record that data in computer information systems, and ultimately make improved operational decisions. These methods include bar codes and radio-frequency identification (RFID), among others.

After completing this course, users will have a better understanding of automatic identification technology and its potential applications in manufacturing. Integrating automatic identification technology with smart manufacturing helps to increase traceability and efficiency within the supply chain.

Class Details

Class Name:
Automatic Identification Technology 141
Difficulty:
Beginner
Number of Lessons:
10

Class Outline

  • Automatic Identification Technology
  • AIT Components
  • Types of AIT
  • Bar Codes
  • Radio-Frequency Identification
  • Review: AIT Methods
  • Serialization
  • Benefits of AIT
  • AIT and the Industrial Internet of Things
  • Review: Applications and Benefits of AIT

Objectives

  • Describe automatic identification technology.
  • Identify the three principal components of AIT.
  • Distinguish among common types of automatic identification technology.
  • Describe bar codes.
  • Describe radio-frequency identification.
  • Describe the use of automatic identification technology in serialization.
  • Describe the benefits of automatic identification technology.
  • Describe the application of AIT in the Industrial Internet of Things.

Job Roles

Certifications

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
AIT Automatic identification technology. Any method used to recognize objects, collect data about them, and record that data in computer information systems without direct human intervention. AIT includes bar codes, radio-frequency identification, biometric identification, and optical character recognition, among other methods.
alphanumeric Consisting of or using both letters and numerals. Encoded data converts Alphanumeric characters are used to create codes that can be read by computers.
application software A program or group of programs designed for end users. Examples of application software include a word processor, a spreadsheet, a web browser, an email client, a media player, or a file viewer.
assembly line An arrangement of workstations used to mass produce products in stages. Assembly lines may produce a single model or multiple models of the same product.
automatic identification technology AIT. Any method used to recognize objects, collect data about them, and record that data in computer information systems without direct human intervention. Automatic identification technology includes bar codes, radio-frequency identification, biometric identification, and optical character recognition, among other methods.
bar code A technology that uses geometric patterns to automatically identify objects. A bar code is read by an optical scanner.
biometric identification An automatic identification technology that uses distinctive, measurable characteristics of individual people to label and distinguish them. Biometric identification includes fingerprint scanning, facial recognition, and iris recognition.
code A system of words, letters, figures, or other symbols substituted for other data. Codes used in AIT contain data about the identity of objects.
counterfeiting Imitating fraudulently. Counterfeiting involves making an exact imitation of something valuable with the intention to deceive or defraud.
data capture device A device that reads encoded data and converts it to an electrical signal. A data capture device is one of three principal components in automatic identification technology.
data decoder A device that transforms an electrical signal into digital data and then into its original, decoded form. A data decoder is one of three principal components in automatic identification technology.
data encoder A device that reads data about the identity of an object and translates it into a code. A data encoder is one of three principal components in automatic identification technology.
distribution center A warehouse or other specialized building that is stocked with products to be redistributed to retailers, to wholesalers, or directly to consumers. Distribution centers are the foundation of a supply chain, as they allow a single location to stock a vast number of products.
downtime The period of time when a machine is not operating or producing. Downtime can be planned or unplanned.
electrical signal A current that carries data from one device to another. In AIT, an electrical signal is created by a data capture device translating encoded data.
electromagnetic fields An area of magnetic force generated from the motion of an electrical charge. Electromagnetic fields carry information in RFID systems.
environmental sensors A device that detects or measures a property in the environment and records, indicates, or otherwise responds to it. Environmental sensors can be coupled with automatic identification technology to prevent waste.
Ethernet A system for connecting a number of computer systems to form a local area network. Ethernet cables transmit electrical signals.
Industrial Internet of Things IIoT. A network of physical devices used in manufacturing that contain computing systems that allow them to send and receive data. The Industrial Internet of Things allows devices to exchange data and automate processes without any human intervention.
inventory A quantity of goods held in stock. Inventory refers to raw materials, partially finished products, and finished products prior to sale.
lead times The time between the initiation and completion of a production process. Information about lead times is provided by AIT.
lifecycle The series of stages a product goes through from conception to the end of its useful life. The lifecycle includes design, production, distribution, and operation stages.
machine-to-machine M2M. The transfer of data between machines and the internet without human interaction. Machine-to-machine communication relies on sensors.
matrix codes A geometric pattern used in 2D bar codes. Matrix codes are found on many shipped packages, drivers licenses, passports, and other forms of identification.
one-dimensional bar codes 1D bar codes. A geometric pattern that represents data with parallel lines that have varying widths and spaces. One-dimensional bar codes, also called linear or unidimensional bar codes, have a 20-character capacity.
optical character recognition OCR. An automatic identification technology that electronically converts images of typed, handwritten, or printed text into machine-encoded text. Optical character recognition is generally used as a form of digital data entry for printed paper data records.
optical scanner A device that scans images or an object and converts it to digital information. Optical scanners are used to read bar codes, among other things.
optical scanners A device that scans images or an object and converts it to digital information. Optical scanners are used to read bar codes, among other things.
piracy The unauthorized use or reproduction of the work of another. Piracy is the illegal copying, distribution, or use of intellectual property.
QR code Quick Response code. A type of two-dimensional bar code that directs a scanner to a website or application. QR codes can be read using mobile devices with built-in cameras, such as smartphones.
Quick Response code QR code. A type of two-dimensional bar code that directs a scanner to a website or application. Quick Response codes can be read using mobile devices with built-in cameras, such as smartphones.
radio signal A type of electromagnetic wave that is longer than infrared light. Radio signals communicate data in RFID.
radio signals A type of electromagnetic wave that is longer than infrared light. Radio signals communicate data in RFID.
radio-frequency identification RFID. A technology that uses electromagnetic fields to automatically identify and track tags attached to objects. Radio-frequency identification requires a scanner and a tag.
reader A device that emits a radio signal to detect and identify an RFID tag within its range in radio-frequency identification. A reader is also known as an RFID scanner.
real-time The actual time during which a process or event occurs. Real-time systems input and process data within milliseconds so that it is available virtually immediately as feedback.
regulatory compliance When a business follows state, federal, and international laws and regulations relevant to its operations. Regulatory compliance requirements vary by industry and by country of operation.
RFID Radio-frequency indentification. A technology that uses electromagnetic fields to automatically identify and track tags attached to objects. RFID requires a scanner and a tag.
RFID scanner • A device that emits a radio signal to detect and identify an RFID tag within its range in radio-frequency identification. An RFID scanner is also known as a reader.
RFID scanner A device that emits a radio signal to detect and identify an RFID tag within its range in radio-frequency identification. An RFID scanner is also known as a reader.
RFID tag A device attached to an identified object that receives a radio signal and then automatically transmits a different signal in radio-frequency identification. An RFID tag is also known as a transponder.
serialization The process of tagging individual units of inventory with unique identifiers that are assigned sequentially to each item. Serialization may take the form of serial numbers, RFID tags, or other unique, sequential tags.
smart manufacturing Technologically integrated manufacturing that creates and uses data in real time to address the needs of the factory, supplier, and customer. Smart manufacturing is an advancement of traditional manufacturing automation.
supply chain management The process of planning, implementing, and controlling supply chain activities to achieve maximum customer value and sustain competitive advantage. Supply chain management oversees each area of the supply chain, including development, sourcing, production, and delivery.
traceability The ability to verify the history, application, or location of an item using data. Traceability throughout the entire product lifecycle can be ensured by the data from automatic identification technology.
transponder A device attached to an identified object that receives a radio signal and then automatically transmits a different signal in radio-frequency identification. A transponder is also known as an RFID tag.
two-dimensional bar codes 2D bar codes. A geometric pattern that represents data with rectangles, dots, and matrix codes. Two-dimensional bar codes, which include QR codes, have a 7,089-character capacity.