Safety for Assembly 211

The class “Safety for Assembly” provides a comprehensive overview of different safety precautions for assembly. Assemblers must wear proper clothing and protective equipment, which varies for different tasks. A safe assembly site is organized and clean, with clear paths around workstations. Working in assembly requires an awareness of electrical, forklift, and point of operation safety precautions, as well as proper fall prevention and tool handling procedures. Applying ergonomics to assembly helps prevent injury caused by repetition, poor posture, and excessive force.

Before beginning any assembly work, assemblers must know the appropriate safety precautions and be trained to use required protective equipment. This can be challenging because there are different precautions for different tasks. After taking this class, users will be familiar with the basic safety guidelines for assembly, which will prepare them to perform various assembly operations safely and effectively.

Class Details

Class Name:
Safety for Assembly 211
Difficulty:
Beginner
Number of Lessons:
16

Class Outline

  • Assembly Safety
  • Proper Dress for Assembly
  • Eye and Ear Protection
  • Tool Safety
  • Power Tool Safety
  • Review: PPE and Tool Safety
  • Assembly Site Safety
  • Electrical Safety
  • Fall Prevention
  • Forklift Safety
  • Point of Operation Safety
  • Review: Assembly Site Safety
  • Ergonomics
  • Posture
  • Repetition
  • Review: Ergonomics

Objectives

  • Describe assembly safety.
  • Describe proper dress for assembly.
  • Describe eye and ear protection.
  • Describe safe practices for working with tools.
  • Describe safe practices for working with power tools.
  • Describe a safe assembly site.
  • Describe electrical safety precautions.
  • Describe precautions for fall prevention.
  • Describe forklift safety precautions.
  • Describe point of operation safety precautions.
  • Describe ergonomics.
  • Explain how posture relates to assembly.
  • Explain how to prevent injuries caused by repetitive tasks.

Job Roles

Certifications

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
adhesive bonding The joining of two or more materials using adhesive substances such as pastes, gels, and tape. Adhesive bonding can be used to join similar and dissimilar materials.
American National Standards Institute ANSI. A private, non-profit organization that administers and coordinates voluntary standards and systems in the United States. The American National Standards Institute provides guidelines that ensure workplace safety.
ANSI American National Standards Institute. A private, non-profit organization that administers and coordinates voluntary standards and systems in the United States. ANSI provides guidelines that ensure workplace safety.
assemblers A person who assembles parts. Assemblers must be aware of workplace safety regulations and guidelines.
assemblies A larger part or product that consists of several other components that have been joined together. Assemblies are made up of multiple smaller subassemblies.
assembly The process of joining components together into a larger or completed part. Assembly methods include mechanical fastening, adhesive bonding, and welding.
assembly site The place where assembly is performed. Employees at an assembly site require PPE for safety.
back brace A device used to support the spine by limiting its motion. A back brace is a type of PPE for lifting.
barrier guards Safety equipment that prevents assembler's hands from entering the point of operation. Barrier guards should never be tampered with.
base component A material or object that is being joined by assembly. The place where a fastener attaches to the base component is called the point of operation.
blow guns A power-driven tool that uses compressed air to clear away industrial debris from parts, workstations, and machines. Blow guns should not be connected unless they will be used immediately.
body harness A safety device composed of straps connected around the legs, waist, and shoulders that is attached to a hoist. A body harness may be required when working at elevated heights to prevent falls.
brittle Resistant to being drawn, stretched, or formed. Brittle materials are more likely to chip, shatter, or cause fasteners to ricochet.
capacity The maximum amount of power that a tool can operate at safely. Capacity is outlined in a power tool's specifications.
contract To squeeze together. Muscles contract when used to perform a task.
earmuffs Ear wear that covers the entire outer ear to protect hearing. Earmuffs protect the entire ear from debris or sparks as well.
earplugs Ear wear that is inserted into the ear to protect hearing. Earplugs protect the inner ear from noise.
electric shock The flow of electricity through the body. Electric shock can cause falls, burns, and even death.
electric tools A tool that is powered by an electrical current. Electric tools pose the risk of electric shock and other injuries.
ergonomics The scientific study of equipment, workspace, and production environment design to increase comfort, safety, and productivity. Ergonomic concerns include force, posture, and repetition.
face shield A protective device that guards the face and eyes. Face shields can be required PPE for some assembly operations.
fasteners A device that holds two or more objects together or locates them in relation to each other. Common fasteners include screws, bolts, rivets, and nails.
fastening tool A tool used for assembling a fastener into a base component. Fastening tools include hand and power tools such as screwdrivers, wrenches, rivet guns, and more.
fire shields A flame-resistant, tarp-like device that is used to isolate a work area. Fire shields protect bystanders from UV radiation, flying debris, and sparks.
flammable Easily ignited and capable of starting a fire. Flammable materials should be kept away from electric tools.
force A push or pull that gives energy to an object. Assemblers exerting excess force is an ergonomic concern.
forklifts A powered industrial vehicle with a pronged platform on the front for lifting material. Forklifts are used to lift and transport heavy loads.
grounded Safely connected to a neutral body, like the earth, that can absorb stray electrical charges. Electric tools must be grounded to help prevent electric shock.
hand tools A tool powered by an operator's manual force. Hand tools must be in good working condition to avoid injury.
impact wrenches A power-driven tool that uses a discontinuous drive clutch and compressed air to achieve torque. Impact wrenches should never be connected unless they will be used immediately.
jaws A component of a wrench that grips bolts and nuts. Jaws that are dull can cause a wrench to slip, creating a safety hazard.
light curtains A field of light that stops a machine when the light is blocked by an object. Light curtains should be checked to ensure they are operating properly before assembly begins.
lockout/tagout A method of protecting employees from accidental machine startup by locking and labeling devices. Lockout/tagout renders a tool or machine inoperable.
mechanical fastening The joining of two or more materials with devices called fasteners. Mechanical fastening is often used for parts that require disassembly and reassembly.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA. A government agency that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration creates regulations that ensure that assemblers work in safe and healthy environments.
OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration. A government agency that sets the standards for working conditions in the United States. OSHA creates regulations that ensure that assemblers work in safe and healthy environments.
personal protective equipment PPE. Any clothing or device worn to minimize exposure to hazards and prevent injury. Personal protective equipment may include eye and ear protection, safety footwear, gloves, and other devices.
pinch point Any place where two components meet. Pinch points can trap body parts and cause serious injury.
platform A permanent open-sided structure that is elevated above the surrounding floor or ground. A platform allows assemblers to work at elevated heights.
pneumatic tools A tool that is powered by compressed air. Pneumatic tools should not be connected or loaded unless they will be used immediately.
point of operation The area where work is performed, often where the tool comes into contact with the workpiece. In fastening, the point of operation is the place where the fastener contacts the base component.
posture How a person stands, sits, or arranges his or her body. Good posture can reduce the occurrence of ergonomic injuries.
power tools A tool powered by an external source of energy such as electricity or compressed air. Power tools require more safety precautions in addition to those for hand tools.
PPE Personal protective equipment. Any clothing or device worn to minimize exposure to hazards and prevent injury. PPE may include eye and ear protection, safety footwear, gloves, and other devices.
radiation Energy emitted by light sources in the form of particles and waves. Radiation from ultraviolet lights can burn the skin and eyes.
repetitive motion injury A localized musculoskeletal disorder or injury caused by performing persistent, continual movement. Repetitive motion injuries most commonly occur in the joints of the arms.
respirator A breathing device worn to prevent inhalation of hazardous substances. A respirator protects assemblers working with harmful fumes.
ricochet To rebound from a surface. Fasteners ricochet more often when used with hard or brittle materials.
rivet guns A power-driven tool that uses compressed air to force rivets into an object. Rivet guns are commonly pneumatic tools.
safety glasses Protective eyeglasses with metal or plastic frames and impact-resistant lenses. Safety glasses must always be worn during assembly operations.
safety goggles Tight-fitting eye protection that completely covers the eyes and the area surrounding the eyes. Safety goggles are sometimes worn instead of safety glasses during assembly operations.
safety shoes Footwear that protects the feet and ankles from hazards such as impact, heat, and electric shock. Safety shoes often have reinforced toe areas.
safety-toed boots Protective footwear with a reinforced toe area. Safety-toed boots prevent foot injury from falling objects.
scaffold A temporary raised platform that is usually constructed of metal or wooden crosspieces, supports or cables, and metal or wooden planking. A scaffold allows assemblers to work at elevated heights.
screwdriver A tool used to fasten and tighten screws. Screwdrivers have a handle on one end and a blade on the other that fits into the recess in the head of a corresponding screw.
side shields Devices attached to safety glasses to protect the eyes from flying debris. Safety glasses with side shields must be worn during assembly operations.
spatter Liquid metal droplets expelled from the welding process. Spatter is a safety risk for welders.
specifications A description of the essential physical and technical properties of a machine or device. Specifications describe a tool's capabilities, including its capacity.
subassemblies A part that consists of smaller parts or sub-components and is used in the assembly of larger parts. Subassemblies are joined with other components to create larger assemblies.
suspension ropes Safety equipment that consists of ropes that are suspended from the ceiling and attached to the assembler. Suspension ropes may be required when working at elevated heights to prevent falls.
torque The amount of rotational force required to tighten a fastener. Reaching torque with a fastening tool can cause a jerk in an assembler's arm called torque reaction.
torque reaction A jerk that assemblers feel in the handle of the tool they are using when torque is reached. Torque reaction is undesirable and is an ergonomic concern because it can cause injury.
ultraviolet UV. Potentially harmful light that is invisible to the naked eye because it consists of wavelengths shorter than those of visible violet light. Ultraviolet light produces radiation that can burn the skin and the eyes.
UV Ultraviolet. Potentially harmful light that is invisible to the naked eye because it consists of wavelengths shorter than those of visible violet light. UV light produces radiation that can burn the skin and the eyes.
welding The joining of two or more materials using heat, pressure, or a combination of energy sources. Welding forms a permanent bond.
wrench A tool used for fastening nuts and bolts. Wrenches contain fixed or moving jaws or a round attachment that grips nuts and bolts.