Process Design and Development 133

This class covers the approaches to process design, particularly concurrent engineering and design for manufacturability. The class also addresses strategies for enhancing and testing manufacturability, and process analysis, modeling, and documentation.

Class Details

Class Name:
Process Design and Development 133
Version:
1.0
Difficulty:
Beginner
Number of Lessons:
15
Additional Language:
Spanish

Class Outline

  • Objectives
  • Process Design and Development
  • Approaches to Process Design
  • Process Selection
  • Process Planning: Preproduction
  • Strategies for Enhancing Manufacturability
  • Testing Manufacturability: CAD
  • Testing Manufacturability: Prototyping
  • Common Prototypes
  • Computer-aided Process Planning
  • Process Simulation and Analysis
  • Systems Modeling
  • Process Development and Documentation
  • Document Management
  • Summary

Objectives

  • Describe process design and development.
  • Describe different approaches to process design.
  • Describe a tolerance stack.
  • Describe design for manufacturability.
  • Describe strategies for enhancing manufacturability.
  • Describe ways to test manufacturability.
  • Describe prototyping.
  • Define types of prototypes.
  • Describe computer-aided process planning.
  • Describe simulation.
  • Describe systems modeling.
  • Differentiate between common forms of process documentation.
  • Describe document management.

Job Roles

Certifications

SME
  • CMfgT

Glossary

Vocabulary Term Definition
CAD Computer-aided design. The use of computers for the design and documentation of products. CAD allows designers to access standard part and component drawings for the purpose of evaluating how they can be used in a particular part design.
CAD/CAM Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing. CAD/CAM is the use of software to aid in the design and manufacturing of a product.
CAPP Computer-aided process planning. The use of software to aid in the planning of the processes that will create a product. CAPP happens between CAD and CAM.
change management A system designed to update documents according to particular changes to document versions. Change management allows users to access the latest version of a document, while showing all previous versions and the records of any changes made therein.
computer-aided design CAD. The use of computers for the design and documentation of products. CAD allows designers to access standard part and component drawings for the purpose of evaluating how they can be used in a particular part design.
computer-aided process planning CAPP. The use of software to aid in the planning of the processes that will create a product. CAPP happens between CAD and CAM.
concurrent engineering Also called integrated product design, the development and design of a product with the simulataneous input of diverse teams. The integrated nature of the concurrent model allows revisions early in the product and process design.
design for manufacturability DFM. A methodology that encourages the thoughtful design of a product so that it is "easy" to manufacture. DFM considers options that increase efficiency and reduce costs, while precluding the need for costly design revisions later.
deterministic model A model built with data and known phenomena that occur as a consequence of the data. Deterministic models operate without randomness and arrive at one outcome from a given set of variables.
DFM Design for Manufacturability. A methodology that encourages the thoughtful design of a product so that it is "easy" to manufacture. DFM considers options that increase efficiency and reduce costs, while precluding the need for costly design revisions later.
document control A computer system or filing system used to track and store documents, computer files, and other important information critical to the operation of a manufacturing facility. A major goal of document control is convenient access to the most up-to-date and critical versions of documents.
form study prototype An early product model created to test the physical aspects of the design without necessarily modeling the appearance or function of the product.
functional prototype An early product model created to test the final qualities of a product, such as appearance, form, and functionality.
generative CAPP system A computer-aided process planning system that uses stores of general information and manufacturing logic to plan the processes for a new product.
heavy manufacturing Manufacturing activity that is generally capital-intensive and business-oriented, with a relatively high environmental impact. Heavy manufacturing facilities are generally located away from residential areas; usually require large amounts of raw materials, area, and power; and produce large amounts of residual waste.
integrated product design Also called concurrent engineering, the development and design of a product with the simulataneous input of diverse teams. The integrated nature of the concurrent model allows revisions early in the product and process design.
light manufacturing Manufacturing activity that is generally less capital-intensive and more consumer-oriented, with a relatively low environmental impact. Light manufacturing facilities are generally located near residential areas; require less amounts of raw materials, area, and power; and produce low amounts of residual waste.
manufacturability The degree to which a product can be manufactured easily, with maximum efficiency, minimum costs, and little barrier to being competitive in the marketplace. Manufacturability is the goal of concurrent engineering.
modular design A strategy that views products as a series of smaller components, or modules, that are created individually for use across a variety of individual products. Using modular design is a strategy for enhancing the manufacturability of a product.
operation sheet A form of process documentation that provides detailed information about each stop in the routing sheet. The information of each operation includes details like tooling and workholding requirements and machining variables like speeds and feeds.
preproduction process planning The simultaneous design of the product and the manufacturing processes required to create the product. Preproduction process planning occurs before the product begins production.
process flow chart A visual representation of the steps required to complete a process and manufacture a product. Various symbols represent the value-added and non-value-added activities involved in creating a product.
process planning The design and development of the activities that make a product. The goal of process planning is to make the manufacturing process the best possible.
proof-of-concept prototype An early product model created to test the design of a product without necessarily modeling the appearance, the materials, or the processes ultimately used to make the product.
prototype An early model used to complete design evaluation. Common prototypes include the proof-of-principle, form study, user experience, visual, and functional prototypes.
prototyping The process of creating the first products as a test for a full production run.
routing sheet A form of process documentation that outlines the path for the product as it moves through the creation process, beginning as raw stock and ending as a finished part.
setup instructions A form of process documentation that supplies additional details for trained workers who perform the initial setup and changeover for discrete jobs.
simulation A computer-driven technology used to duplicate real-world and real-time situations in order to evaluate behavior under real conditions. Simulation can test the behavior of a manufacturing process before it is used to make an actual product.
stochastic model A model built with information that can be used to predict or estimate outcomes that are unknown. Stochastic models operate with randomness and arrive at one reality from a set of possible realities based on probability.
systems theory The study of systems for the purpose of generating universal principles that can be applied to a variety of systems. According to systems theory, any system can be modeled in an attempt to capture and describe its nature.
tolerance analysis The detailed examination of the possible accumulated variation in a product design. The purpose of tolerance analysis is to make sure specified tolerances are in line with a product's end use.
tolerance stacks Accumulated variation that occurs when successive acceptable tolerances build on one another to form an unacceptable tolerance. Tolerance stacks can render a product unusable.
user experience prototype An early product model created to test how the end user interacts with the product without necessarily modeling properties like the appearance.
variant CAPP system A computer-aided process planning system that uses information from previous products to inform the planning of processes for a new product.
visual prototype An early product model created to test the aesthetics of the product with necessarily modeling the function of the product.
work instructions A form of process documentation that provides details specific to the duties of the equipment operator.