Additive Manufacturing

Many companies are starting to recognize the benefits additive manufacturing (AM) offers in terms of speed, simplicity, reliability, and cost. Additive manufacturing is a process in which a three-dimensional computer model design is built into a physical object by joining thin layers of material. AM is a versatile field that encompasses a variety of methods, materials, and applications.

These classes explain the fundamental concepts of additive manufacturing, including the main principles behind AM and the safety precautions to take during the process. These courses also introduce the basic steps in additive manufacturing and discuss the variety of methods and materials that are used to create AM products.


Class Functional Area Format Difficulty Department
123
Classes 1 to 10 of 28
Introduction to Additive Manufacturing 111

Introduction to Additive Manufacturing 111 provides an overview of additive manufacturing (AM), including its history, advantages, disadvantages, basic steps, methods, and materials. Additive manufacturing is a rapidly growing industry that allows for rapid prototyping and the creation of more complex ...

Related 1.0 Class:
Intro to Additive Manufacturing 110
Smart Manufacturing Online Beginner Additive Manufacturing
Additive Manufacturing Safety 121

Additive Manufacturing Safety describes the various safety hazards involved in additive manufacturing (AM) and the precautions operators should follow to protect themselves. AM methods and processes involve the use of moving and hot components, hazardous materials, and devices that produce ...

Related 1.0 Class:
Additive Manufacturing Safety 120
Smart Manufacturing Online Beginner Additive Manufacturing
The Basic Additive Manufacturing Process 131

The Basic Additive Manufacturing Process 131 discusses the general steps involved in most additive manufacturing (AM) procedures. Important steps include creating 3D computer models, converting those models to AM-compatible file formats, setting up and running an AM machine, and removing ...

Related 1.0 Class:
The Basic Additive Manufacturing Process 130
Smart Manufacturing Online Beginner Additive Manufacturing
Additive Manufacturing Methods and Materials 141

Additive Manufacturing Methods and Materials provides a comprehensive introduction to the methods and materials that can be used in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing encompasses a wide range of methods and processes that are constantly evolving as manufacturers continue to ...

Related 1.0 Class:
Additive Manufacturing Methods and Materials 140
Smart Manufacturing Online Beginner Additive Manufacturing
Introduction to Hybrid Manufacturing 151

Introduction to Hybrid Manufacturing 151 covers the basics of hybrid additive manufacturing (AM) applications. Hybrid AM combines the benefits of subtractive and additive manufacturing (AM) methods in a single digital workflow. Subtractive manufacturing, including machining and related processes, removes material ...

Smart Manufacturing Online Beginner Additive Manufacturing
Rapid Prototyping 161

Rapid Prototyping 161 provides an overview of the process, materials, and applications of rapid prototyping in additive manufacturing. Rapid prototyping uses various additive manufacturing strategies to test, analyze, and refine a part prototype before putting it into full production. As ...

Smart Manufacturing Online Beginner Additive Manufacturing
Additive Manufacturing: Prototype to Production 162

Additive Manufacturing: Prototype to Production 162 provides an overview of the production uses, considerations, and approaches to additive manufacturing (AM). Although often used for rapid prototyping, it is becoming more common for manufacturing facilities to use additive manufacturing for end-use ...

Smart Manufacturing Online Beginner Additive Manufacturing
Design for Additive Manufacturing 201

Design for Additive Manufacturing 201 discusses how to conceptualize and create a part design for an additive manufacturing (AM) process. DFAM provides engineers with an incredible degree of design freedom. AM processes can create prototypes or parts with increased complexity, ...

Smart Manufacturing Online Intermediate Additive Manufacturing
Metrology for Additive Manufacturing 202

Metrology for Additive Manufacturing 202 offers an overview of common inspection tools and methods used in additive manufacturing (AM). Successfully measuring any AM part or process depends on accurate, precise inspection of AM part dimensions, surfaces, and internal structures. This ...

Smart Manufacturing Online Intermediate Additive Manufacturing
Additive Manufacturing Materials Science 211

Additive Manufacturing Materials Science provides a comprehensive overview of the materials that can be used with additive manufacturing (AM) processes. AM materials include a variety of polymers, metals, composites, and ceramics. Each material is distinguished from another material by microstructure, ...

Smart Manufacturing Online Intermediate Additive Manufacturing
FormatFunctional AreaDepartment IDDepartmentClass IDClass NameDescriptionDifficultyLanguageRelated Classes
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510010 Introduction to Additive Manufacturing 111 Introduction to Additive Manufacturing 111 provides an overview of additive manufacturing (AM), including its history, advantages, disadvantages, basic steps, methods, and materials. Additive manufacturing is a rapidly growing industry that allows for rapid prototyping and the creation of more complex and functional parts, including end-use parts and traditional manufacturing tooling. AM encompasses a variety of build methods, such as material jetting and material extrusion.An understanding of the AM basics is useful for anyone working in the manufacturing industry. AM methods often streamline manufacturing processes and improve products and profitability. After completing this class, users will have gained important foundational AM knowledge, including the different AM methods and processes, the uses of AM, and the potential for future AM industrial growth.BeginnerEnglish(510110) Intro to Additive Manufacturing 110
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510020 Additive Manufacturing Safety 121 Additive Manufacturing Safety describes the various safety hazards involved in additive manufacturing (AM) and the precautions operators should follow to protect themselves. AM methods and processes involve the use of moving and hot components, hazardous materials, and devices that produce radiation. Operators must be aware of these hazards as well as the safety protocols used to reduce them. For example, all AM materials have specific handling guidelines, including the required personal protective equipment (PPE) and ventilation for that material.Though many AM safety protocols will be familiar to anyone who has worked in a manufacturing environment, there are also hazards unique to AM. Knowing these hazards and safety precautions will help ensure that an AM operation runs smoothly, efficiently, and safely. After taking this class, users will be able to identify AM hazards, understand common safety standards, and safely operate AM equipment.BeginnerEnglish(510120) Additive Manufacturing Safety 120
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510030 The Basic Additive Manufacturing Process 131 The Basic Additive Manufacturing Process 131 discusses the general steps involved in most additive manufacturing (AM) procedures. Important steps include creating 3D computer models, converting those models to AM-compatible file formats, setting up and running an AM machine, and removing and post-processing parts. The manufacturing industry is increasingly finding AM to be an important resource for rapid prototyping and creating end-use parts, so it is essential that engineers and operators understand AM technology and its basic processes. Understanding the basic AM process will help engineers and operators more easily learn a specific AM operation's unique considerations and procedures. A basic understanding of AM can also help with assessing AM's value within a manufacturing operation. After completing this course, users will understand the standard steps involved in any AM process.BeginnerEnglish(510130) The Basic Additive Manufacturing Process 130
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510040 Additive Manufacturing Methods and Materials 141 Additive Manufacturing Methods and Materials provides a comprehensive introduction to the methods and materials that can be used in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing encompasses a wide range of methods and processes that are constantly evolving as manufacturers continue to make new developments. AM methods include material extrusion, directed energy deposition (DED), material jetting, binder jetting, powder bed fusion (PBF), vat photopolymerization, and sheet lamination. Different AM methods require different materials, and each method provides specific advantages and disadvantages.Understanding each AM method's basic principles, advantages, and disadvantages is essential to ensuring an AM part build's success. After completing this class, users will be able to distinguish between the different AM methods and choose the best AM method for a particular application.BeginnerEnglish(510140) Additive Manufacturing Methods and Materials 140
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510050 Introduction to Hybrid Manufacturing 151 Introduction to Hybrid Manufacturing 151 covers the basics of hybrid additive manufacturing (AM) applications. Hybrid AM combines the benefits of subtractive and additive manufacturing (AM) methods in a single digital workflow. Subtractive manufacturing, including machining and related processes, removes material from a workpiece to make complete parts with superior accuracy and surface quality. AM builds complete or partially complete parts by creating or fusing layers of raw material, which allows highly complex part geometry. Hybrid AM can be applied using separate, networked machines, but all-in-one hybrid AM machines can produce parts that are impossible to build using separate machines.After taking this course, users will be familiar with the types of additive and subtractive manufacturing methods commonly used in hybrid AM applications. Users will also understand potential benefits of producing parts using hybrid AM, particularly with all-in-one hybrid machine.BeginnerEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510060 Rapid Prototyping 161 Rapid Prototyping 161 provides an overview of the process, materials, and applications of rapid prototyping in additive manufacturing. Rapid prototyping uses various additive manufacturing strategies to test, analyze, and refine a part prototype before putting it into full production. As the prototype develops, additive manufacturing strategies can help reduce costs without affecting part quality.After taking this class, users will be able to define what additive manufacturing is and describe how it functions and is deployed with prototyping. Additionally, users will better understand the advantages and usefulness of rapid prototyping and appreciate the design and development steps needed to create a prototype with additive manufacturing.BeginnerEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510065 Additive Manufacturing: Prototype to Production 162 Additive Manufacturing: Prototype to Production 162 provides an overview of the production uses, considerations, and approaches to additive manufacturing (AM). Although often used for rapid prototyping, it is becoming more common for manufacturing facilities to use additive manufacturing for end-use products. As end-use processes evolve, comparing key factors such as time, cost, and quality can help decision-makers choose between AM and traditional machining for their parts or products. After taking this class, users will be able to describe how additive manufacturing is used for production, identify the production processes, and describe their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, users will better understand the material properties and appearance of additively manufactured parts and appreciate how end-use processes can complement traditional manufacturing.BeginnerEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510150 Design for Additive Manufacturing 201 Design for Additive Manufacturing 201 discusses how to conceptualize and create a part design for an additive manufacturing (AM) process. DFAM provides engineers with an incredible degree of design freedom. AM processes can create prototypes or parts with increased complexity, functionality, and integration. AM also allows for other unique manufacturing opportunities, such as mass customization.Though there are some design limitations with DFAM, such as production speed and material choice, the process is mainly characterized by the opportunities it provides engineers. After taking this course, users will understand key DFAM concepts, such as functional complexity and hierarchical complexity, the basics of AM production processes, and how DFAM concepts relate to basic AM production.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510195 Metrology for Additive Manufacturing 202 Metrology for Additive Manufacturing 202 offers an overview of common inspection tools and methods used in additive manufacturing (AM). Successfully measuring any AM part or process depends on accurate, precise inspection of AM part dimensions, surfaces, and internal structures. This class discusses common hand-held devices, such as calipers and micrometers, as well as other categories of dimensional measuring devices like contact coordinate measuring machines (CMMs), noncontact CMMs, optical comparators, and air gages.Quality in AM depends on consistent measurement and inspection, which ensures that end-use parts are within tolerance and meet customer expectations. After taking this class, users will be able to describe the general uses and applications of common contact and noncontact inspection instruments and probes, as well as inspection considerations unique to AM and the smart manufacturing environment.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510160 Additive Manufacturing Materials Science 211 Additive Manufacturing Materials Science provides a comprehensive overview of the materials that can be used with additive manufacturing (AM) processes. AM materials include a variety of polymers, metals, composites, and ceramics. Each material is distinguished from another material by microstructure, mechanical and physical properties, and life cycle. Different AM processes require the use of different AM materials. Therefore, an individual must understand materials’ science to ensure proper material selection.Understanding the materials that are compatible with additive manufacturing processes is an essential part of AM process success. After completing this class, users will not only be able to distinguish between thermoplastic and thermoset polymers, ferrous metals and nonferrous alloys, and ceramic and composite materials, but users will also be able to determine which material type is most appropriate for use with a specific AM process.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510170 Integrating Additive Manufacturing with Traditional Manufacturing 221 Integrating Additive Manufacturing with Traditional Manufacturing discusses the factors manufacturers should consider when adding an additive manufacturing (AM) component to a traditional manufacturing operation, including cost, logistics, and best uses of AM with traditional manufacturing, among other concerns. Originally used for prototyping, AM has increasingly found more roles in traditional manufacturing processes, such as creating tooling or end-use parts. However, because the procedures and tools are so different, combining the two kinds of manufacturing requires considerable adjustments.Logistical concerns of integrating AM with traditional manufacturing include purchasing the correct machines and updating safety protocols. Design concerns involve upskilling engineers so that they can take full advantage of AM capabilities. After taking this course, users will understand how to take full advantage of AM as a tool to augment a traditional manufacturing operation.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510180 Additive Manufacturing as a Secondary Process 231 Additive Manufacturing as a Secondary Process provides a comprehensive overview of the way in which manufacturers can use additive manufacturing (AM) as a secondary, or indirect, process. AM methods can make a variety of tooling, such as molds and patterns, for use in several different casting, forming, and molding processes. Using AM as a secondary process benefits traditional manufacturing processes by reducing costs associated with lead time, tooling, and labor. An individual must understand the different advantages and disadvantages associated with AM as a secondary process prior to determining whether or not to utilize it.Knowledge about AM secondary processes and their benefits is important in order to understand the full impact that AM has upon traditional manufacturing. After completing this class, users will be able to identify the traditional manufacturing areas that benefit from using AM as a secondary process and the advantages and disadvantages of doing so.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510190 Nondestructive Testing for Additive Manufacturing 241 Nondestructive Testing for Additive Manufacturing provides an overview of the most common nondestructive testing (NDT) methods used in additive manufacturing (AM). Unlike destructive testing, NDT inspects parts without affecting their future usability. As a result, it is frequently more practical for inspecting AM parts, which are often produced in small-batch runs. However, the complex geometries, integrated features, and rough surface finishes of most AM parts can complicate NDT methods.No one NDT method can find every flaw in every AM part. Due to the variety of processes and materials, each AM method produces parts that must be inspected using different NDT methods. Manufacturers must have a proper understanding of the most appropriate NDT methods for AM part inspection to ensure they are used both effectively and reliably. After taking this class, users will be able to describe the most common NDT methods used in AM as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510105 Reverse Engineering for Additive Manufacturing 242 Reverse Engineering for Additive Manufacturing 242 provides an overview of reverse engineering (RE) and how it is used in additive manufacturing (AM). Reverse engineering is the process of determining how an existing item was designed and manufactured and is often used to recreate existing items for which no design files or related information exists. For AM, RE generally consists of scanning a part with an optical scanner to create a point cloud, converting the point cloud to a mesh, and then converting the mesh to a CAD file. The CAD file can then be used as the basis for creating an improved or replacement part with AM.The versatility of additive manufacturing, combined with its increased use, makes reverse engineering a valuable tool for creating and improving part designs. After taking this course, users will be familiar with the different RE tools and processes and how RE can enhance AM applications.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510145 The Additive Manufacturing Supply Chain 251 The Additive Manufacturing Supply Chain provides an overview of significant ways traditional supply chain management differs with the use of additive manufacturing. A typical supply chain in traditional manufacturing begins with the procurement of raw materials, then moves on to production and assembly, centralized storage of finished goods, and finally, distribution to the consumer. Additive manufacturing, which turns digital three-dimensional models into physical objects by building them up in layers, has the potential to combine production and assembly into fewer steps, to minimize storage needs, and to be more responsive to customer needs.Additive manufacturing increases supply chain responsiveness and competitiveness, but it also presents unique concerns, particularly with regards to materials procurement and storage. After completing this course, users will have a better awareness of both the advantages and the challenges of the additive manufacturing supply chain.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510147 Managing the Additive Manufacturing Supply Chain 252 Managing the Additive Manufacturing Supply Chain 252 provides an overview of significant ways traditional supply chain management differs with the use of additive manufacturing. The course introduces concepts of digital thread, digital twin, serialization, and blockchain technologies and explores how these methods may be used to effectively manage additive manufacturing supply chains. After completing this course, users will have a better awareness of how serialization and blockchain can increase traceability, guard against counterfeits, and lead to greater security in the additive manufacturing supply chain.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510155 Hybrid Manufacturing with Directed Energy Deposition 261 Hybrid Manufacturing with Directed Energy Deposition 261 focuses on the use of directed energy deposition (DED) in hybrid additive manufacturing (hybrid AM) applications. DED, which uses a thermal energy source to melt metal into layers to build a part, is the most common additive manufacturing (AM) process used in hybrid AM applications. DED has faster build rates than other AM methods used in hybrid AM and can be more easily adopted for use in computer numerical control (CNC) systems. Manufacturers considering hybrid AM technology should understand the benefits of DED, its limitations, and how hybrid DED systems can help compensate for these limitations. After taking this course, users will understand how DED tools differ from other AM tools, and why it can be ideal for hybrid AM applications.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510185 Lightweighting with Additive Manufacturing 271 Lightweighting with Additive Manufacturing 271 describes the methods by which additive manufacturing can facilitate lightweighting, which is a design method that reduces the weight of manufactured parts and products without reducing their functionality. The class focuses on material reduction, topology optimization, and lattice structures in additive manufacturing.After completing this course, users will be able to identify key industrial applications and methods of lightweighting with additive manufacturing, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of lightweighting in this way.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510100 Additive Manufacturing Qualification 291 Additive Manufacturing Qualification 291 explores current standards and challenges related to qualifying AM machines and processes. In order to make end-use parts at large scale with AM technology, manufacturers must demonstrate their ability to consistently produce quality parts based on current standards. However, standards exist for only some AM processes. Since AM parts must meet the same safety and performance standards as traditionally produced parts, AM users must also develop in-house standards and quality management systems for AM production.Engineers and technicians producing AM part designs must focus on continuous improvement to develop best practices for overcoming the challenges of AM standardization. After completing the class, users will be familiar with requirements for qualifying AM materials, machines, parts, and processes.IntermediateEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510200 Design for Fused Deposition Modeling 301 Design for Fused Deposition Modeling provides an overview of basic design considerations for fused deposition modeling (FDM). FDM has a wide range of manufacturing applications, including widespread usage in the medical field and the automotive industry. This course introduces users to the physical and mechanical properties of common FDM build materials like ABS, PET, and nylon. In addition, this course also highlights factors for support and internal structures as well as finishing and post-processing challenges associated with FDM. After completing Design for FDM, users will understand how various materials function during the design process for FDM and how they are used with various applications including end-use production. Users will also be able to recognize basic safety and design issues associated with FDM parts and products.BeginnerEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510205 Design for Material Jetting 302 Design for Material Jetting provides an overview of basic design considerations for material jetting. This course introduces users to the materials and mechanical processes associated with material jetting, also known as PolyJetting. Common materials used in material jetting include waxes and types of photopolymers that act like polymers such as ABS and polypropylene. This course also highlights finishing and post-processing challenges associated with material jetting, including factors for support and internal structures. Material jetting has a wide range of manufacturing applications, including widespread usage in the medical field and the automotive industry. After completing the class, users will understand how various materials function during the design process for material jetting and how they are used in various applications. Users will also be able to recognize basic material considerations and design issues associated with material jetting.BeginnerEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510210 Design for Directed Energy Deposition 303 Design for Directed Energy Deposition 303 covers the basics of directed energy deposition (DED) and important considerations for DED design. DED is a metal additive manufacturing (AM) process that is often used for part repair and adding part features, but is also used to build complete, near-net shape parts. Different types of DED may use different heat sources to melt various types of metal feedstock, including powdered metal and metal wire.Designers and AM technicians must consider details like deposition width, metallurgy, and other important factors when producing parts with DED. After taking this course, users will understand how different DED processes, machine tools, materials, and other factors affect designing parts for DED.AdvancedEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510215 Design for Laser Powder Bed Fusion 304 Design for Laser Powder Bed Fusion 304 covers the basics of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) and important considerations for L-PBF design. L-PBF is an additive manufacturing (AM) process that can build complex parts to net shape. L-PBF most commonly uses powdered metal but can also use polymers and other materials. Designers and technicians must consider details like metallurgy, machine conditions, and other important factors when producing parts with L-PBF.After taking this course, users will understand the different L-PBF methods, selective laser sintering and selective laser melting, and how they differ. Users will also understand how software, operating conditions, materials, and other factors affect the L-PBF design process.AdvancedEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510220 Design for Vat Photopolymerization 305 Design for Vat Photopolymerization provides an overview of basic design considerations for vat photopolymerization. This course introduces users to the materials and mechanical processes associated with vat photopolymerization, including subtypes stereolithography (SLA) and digital light processing (DPL). Common raw materials used in vat photopolymerization include photopolymers with properties similar to common plastics such as ABS and polypropylene. In addition, this course also highlights finishing and post-processing procedures associated with vat photopolymerization, including factors for support and internal structures. Vat photopolymerization has a wide range of manufacturing applications, including widespread usage in the medical field and injection molding. After completing this class, users will understand how various materials function during the design process for vat photopolymerization and how they are used in various applications, parts, and projects.AdvancedEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510225 Design for Binder Jetting 306 Design for Binder Jetting 306 provides an overview of basic design considerations for binder jetting processes, systems, and applications. This course introduces users to the unique physical properties associated with common binding agents and raw materials like sand, metal, and ceramic powder. In addition, it also highlights finishing and post-processing challenges associated with binder jetting, including factors for secondary processes like infiltrating and sintering. Binder jetting has several manufacturing applications, including common usage for sand molds, casting, and complex metal objects with low strength, ductility, and toughness. After completing Design for Binder Jetting, users will understand how various materials function during the design process for binder jetting and how they are used with various applications, including end-use production. Users will also be able to recognize basic safety and design issues associated with binder jetting parts and products.BeginnerEnglish
OnlineSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing510230 Design for Sheet Lamination 307 Design for Sheet Lamination 307 introduces design considerations for various sheet lamination methods. Sheet lamination is an additive manufacturing (AM) method that stacks sheets of material to build parts according to a computer-aided design file. Most sheet lamination machines add and cut each successive sheet into the part shape until the build is complete. Different sheet lamination machines may use different materials to create prototypes or end-use parts. After taking this course, users will be able to identify different sheet lamination methods and basic design considerations for each one. Part designers and manufacturers must be familiar with the capabilities and limitations of each sheet lamination method in order to determine the appropriate methods and materials for specific applications.AdvancedEnglish
Instructor-LedSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing918116 Overview of Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing) Technologies Additive manufacturing, or commonly referred to as 3D Printing, is a manufacturing process that supports all aspects of the product development cycle; from prototype to end-use production parts. It reduces your time to market, improves product quality, enhances collaboration and streamlines parts integration. In this multi-level program, you will learn about the current technologies, how they work, and how best to use them to improve your operations. English
Instructor-LedSmart Manufacturing510Additive Manufacturing918117 Additive Manufacturing – Implementation and Best Practices Participants receive comprehensive introductory knowledge of the 3D printing industry. Covering terms and definitions, software and hardware, as well as discussing applications and case studies, students will begin to understand the benefits of 3D printing in a way that is relevant to their business needs. English